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Quotations About / On: ANGEL

  • 41.
    I feel ruefully sure, also, that one must be at least one sort of fool to rush in over ground so well trodden by the angels.
    (J.L. (John Langshaw) Austin (1911-1960), British philosopher. Philosophical Papers, p. 76, Oxford University Press, second edition (1970). Remark concerning discussing the problem of other minds.)
    More quotations from: J.L. (John Langshaw) Austin
  • 42.
    Angels may be very excellent sort of folk in their own way, but we, poor mortals in our present state, would probably find them precious slow company.
    (Jerome K. Jerome (1859-1927), British author. "On Vanity and Vanities," Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow (1889).)
    More quotations from: Jerome K Jerome
  • 43.
    Kings were wont to honour philosophers; but if I had such I would honour them as angels that should have such purity in them that they would not seek when they are the second to be the first, and when they are third to be the second.
    (Elizabeth I (1533-1603), British monarch, Queen of England (1558-1603). As quoted in The Sayings of Queen Elizabeth, ch. 12, by Frederick Chamberlin (1923). To a committee of both Houses of Parliament, which had demanded that she marry and name a successor.)
    More quotations from: Elizabeth I
  • 44.
    Human work must be done honourably and thoroughly, because we are now Men;Mwhether we ever expect to be angels, or were ever slugs, being practically no matter.
    (John Ruskin (1819-1900), British art critic, author. Fors Claveriga, letter 76 (1877).)
    More quotations from: John Ruskin, work
  • 45.
    You would compliment a coxcomb doing a good act, but you would not praise an angel. The silence that accepts merit as the most natural thing in the world, is the highest applause.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Address, July 15, 1838, delivered before the senior class in Divinity College, Cambridge. "The Divinity School Address," repr. in The Portable Emerson, ed. Carl Bode (1946, repr. 1981).)
  • 46.
    Only by obedience to his genius; only by the freest activity in the way constitutional to him, does an angel seem to arise before a man, and lead him by the hand out of all the wards of the prison.
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Lecture, March 3, 1884, in Amory Hall, Boston, Massachusetts. "New England Reformers," Essays, Second Series (1844).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, angel
  • 47.
    What angels invented these splendid ornaments, these rich conveniences, this ocean of air above, this ocean of water beneath, this firmament of earth between? this zodiac of lights, this tent of dropping clouds, this striped coat of climates, this fourfold year?
    (Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), U.S. essayist, poet, philosopher. Nature, ch. 2 (1836, revised and repr. 1849).)
    More quotations from: Ralph Waldo Emerson, ocean, water
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