William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

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Winter


When icicles hang by the wall
And Dick the shepherd blows his nail
And Tom bears logs into the hall,
........................
........................
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23 person liked.
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Comments about this poem (Winter by William Shakespeare )

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  • Rookie - 165 Points Karen Sinclair (1/9/2014 8:15:00 PM)

    A nice warming write of Tom Dick Marion and Joan Surprisingly easy calming write by The Man. Seems to be the write of a man in love who is appreciating the smaller niceties in life with humour. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Mark Jensen (1/9/2013 3:10:00 AM)

    Starring the staring owl! And greasy Joan.

    I see someone on a website says 'Joan' means 'prostitute, ' but Norman Blake in his 'Shakespeare's Non-Standard English' (2006) has a long long list of terms Shakespeare uses to mean 'prostitute' and 'Joan' is not among them. This poem appears late in the very early comedy 'Love's Labour's Lost' but there is no character named Joan in the play. It appears as part of the rather bizarre end of the play as the second of two poems, the first being on 'Spring, ' which Armado introduces as the dialogue that the two learned men have compiled in praise of the Owl and the Cuckoo, adding that It should have followed in the end of our show. I like this poem but find the play rather tiresome. I never have much liked Shakespeare's comedies. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Mark Jensen (1/9/2013 3:10:00 AM)

    Starring the staring owl! And greasy Joan.

    I see someone on a website says 'Joan' means 'prostitute, ' but Norman Blake in his 'Shakespeare's Non-Standard English' (2006) has a long long list of terms Shakespeare uses to mean 'prostitute' and 'Joan' is not among them. This poem appears late in the very early comedy 'Love's Labour's Lost' but there is no character named Joan in the play. It appears as part of the rather bizarre end of the play as the second of two poems, the first being on 'Spring, ' which Armado introduces as the dialogue that the two learned men have compiled in praise of the Owl and the Cuckoo, adding that It should have followed in the end of our show. I like this poem but find the play rather tiresome. I never have much liked Shakespeare's comedies. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Mark Jensen (1/9/2013 3:09:00 AM)

    Starring the staring owl! And greasy Joan.

    I see someone on a website says 'Joan' means 'prostitute, ' but Norman Blake in his 'Shakespeare's Non-Standard English' (2006) has a long long list of terms Shakespeare uses to mean 'prostitute' and 'Joan' is not among them. This poem appears late in the very early comedy 'Love's Labour's Lost' but there is no character named Joan in the play. It appears as part of the rather bizarre end of the play as the second of two poems, the first being on 'Spring, ' which Armado introduces as the dialogue that the two learned men have compiled in praise of the Owl and the Cuckoo, adding that It should have followed in the end of our show. I like this poem but find the play rather tiresome. I never have much liked Shakespeare's comedies. (Report) Reply

  • Bronze Star - 5,737 Points * Sunprincess * (10/18/2012 11:05:00 AM)

    I believe the people mentioned were actually friends
    or relatives..the poem portrays a harsh winter..excellent write.. :) (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 212 Points Ramesh T A (1/9/2012 3:04:00 AM)

    Picture of winter is wonderfully depicted in his characteristic style that no one other than Shakespeare can do better! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie R W (5/14/2007 9:07:00 PM)

    Oh, and for the people who don't know-'blows his nail' means he's blowing on his fingernails to warm them. Roasted crabs= roasted crab apples, not the seafood. Greasy joan keels the pot= stirs the pot to cool its contents. Also, the 'parson's saw' means the 'preacher's sermon.' It's almost impossible to appreciate this poem if you don't understand these terms. Excellent poem! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 128 Points Paul Butters (1/9/2007 5:12:00 PM)

    As I type this, the poem above has a rating of 6.5 from 39 members! Heaven Help the rest of us then! Okay, this isn't, 'To be or not to be...' so surely just a Low Ten? ! ? Feel the bard is only playing here but it's still rather wintry! PaulB. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Paul Myers (9/24/2005 2:09:00 PM)

    What can one say that hasn't been said already about Shakespeare? He really makes me feel like I'm in the middle of winter. I especially like the line 'And greasy Joan doth keel the pot.' (Report) Reply

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