Treasure Island

john tiong chunghoo

(Jan 21,1960 / NEW YORK)

Ulek Mayang


seven leaves
swept asunder in
a tumultuous
and roaring wave

a sea of longing
is played, replayed
this emptiness of night

the moon and sea are
a pair of star crossed lovers
in a futile grasp of reality

they hold onto the flickers
of thoughts in each other's
bossom; an unrequited
love swept in a luminuous
tide of make-believe - -

the moon reposes in a sea
of hope, the sea lets its fate
be guided by the light - - it holds
onto the tail of the moon in
a dance of grief that has
for so long crossed their way

the leaves grovel in
a churning wheel of fate
under the gentle glow of lace
spun by the moon

they are taken out to sea
again and again in a ferocious tide
that whispers, whistles, sighs and roars
to broadcast a destiny
torn and swept in separate ways - -
never to be seen again

Submitted: Tuesday, November 26, 2013
Edited: Wednesday, January 22, 2014
Listen to this poem:

Do you like this poem?
0 person liked.
0 person did not like.

Read this poem in other languages

This poem has not been translated into any other language yet.

I would like to translate this poem »

word flags

What do you think this poem is about?

Poet's Notes about The Poem

http: //www.youtube.com/watch? v=I0KVuptioDU

notes from wiki: Ulek Mayang (Jawi: اولق مايڠ) is a Malay traditional dance from the state of Terengganu in Malaysia. It is a ritualistic dance performed to appease or invoke the spirits of the sea and is always accompanied by a unique song also called Ulek Mayang. A traditional orchestra comprising drums, gong, violin and accordion accompanies the dance.[1]

History[edit]

The Ulek Mayang is said to have its origin in an ancient tale about a sea-princess who fell in love with a fisherman. The princess abducted the fisherman's soul, leaving his body unconscious. His friends entreated a bomoh (shaman) to heal him. When the bomoh conducted the healing ritual to bring the fisherman's soul back, the princess appeared and responded by calling on five of her sisters to her aid. The battle between the bomoh and the six princesses continued until the seventh and the eldest princess appeared and put an end to it.

'I know your origins, ” says the eldest princess, and she commands everyone, 'Let those from the sea to return to the sea, and those from the land to return to the land.'

The grateful bomoh and the fisherman’s friends present the princess with coloured rice as an offering to the spirits of the sea. This practice, along with the Ulek Mayang dance, continued until the Islamic revival movement of recent decades...

Comments about this poem (Ulek Mayang by john tiong chunghoo )

Enter the verification code :

There is no comment submitted by members..

Top Poems

  1. Phenomenal Woman
    Maya Angelou
  2. The Road Not Taken
    Robert Frost
  3. If You Forget Me
    Pablo Neruda
  4. Still I Rise
    Maya Angelou
  5. Dreams
    Langston Hughes
  6. Annabel Lee
    Edgar Allan Poe
  7. If
    Rudyard Kipling
  8. Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
    Robert Frost
  9. I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings
    Maya Angelou
  10. Invictus
    William Ernest Henley

PoemHunter.com Updates

New Poems

  1. Without Purpose Or Reason Affixed, Lawrence S. Pertillar
  2. The Baobab Tree, I Am Krakatoa
  3. Game of chance, Aftab Alam
  4. 'Tween Love and Hatred,, Aftab Alam
  5. Life alright, hasmukh amathalal
  6. A Child Is Like A Flowering Rose, Joseph T. Renaldi
  7. Only one...1, hasmukh amathalal
  8. Caring For A Lonely Heart, Joseph T. Renaldi
  9. Play Any Tune, Neela Nath
  10. It Was the Best Day, Sandra Feldman

Poem of the Day

poet Robert Frost

Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I've tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,
...... Read complete »

 

Modern Poem

poet Ernest G Moll

 

Member Poem

[Hata Bildir]