William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

Song of the Witches: "Double, double toil and trouble" - Poem by William Shakespeare

Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn and caldron bubble.
Fillet of a fenny snake,
In the caldron boil and bake;
Eye of newt and toe of frog,
Wool of bat and tongue of dog,
Adder's fork and blind-worm's sting,
Lizard's leg and howlet's wing,
For a charm of powerful trouble,
Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.

Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn and caldron bubble.
Cool it with a baboon's blood,
Then the charm is firm and good.


Comments about Song of the Witches: "Double, double toil and trouble" by William Shakespeare

  • (4/26/2016 9:14:00 AM)


    ......beautifully composed and rhymes very nicely ★ (Report) Reply

    3 person liked.
    2 person did not like.
  • Fabrizio Frosini (11/21/2015 5:00:00 AM)


    'Double, double toil and trouble, fire burn and cauldron bubble' is one of the most popular lines in English literature.

    At the beginning of Act IV, the three witches chant 'double, double toil and trouble, fire burn and cauldron bubble' while stirring a cauldron and casting a magic spell (Act IV, Scene I, Lines 10-11) . These lines serve as a reminder that their speech is full of double meanings and contradictions. Some of the major characters in the story, including Malcolm, Macduff, and Lady Macbeth, can be seen as foils or doubles for Macbeth. At times, Lady Macbeth takes on Macbeth's role, especially when she takes on the guilt Macbeth should have had for his behavior.
    (Shamekia Thomas)
    (Report) Reply

  • Fabrizio Frosini (11/21/2015 4:58:00 AM)


    from Macbeth, Act 4, Scene 1

    Three of the most pivotal characters in the play Macbeth are the witches, who serve in many ways as one character. Throughout the play, the witches, also known as the weird sisters, tempt Macbeth to behave in evil ways. At the beginning of the play, the three witches predict and tell Macbeth that he will one day become king. Because of their prophecy, Macbeth and his wife decide to kill the king in order to make the prediction come true. After Macbeth is crowned king, he returns to the witches several times to have them predict the rest of his future.
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Poem Submitted: Friday, November 20, 2015



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