Letitia Elizabeth Landon

(1802-1838 / England)

Revenge - Poem by Letitia Elizabeth Landon

Ay, gaze upon her rose-wreathed hair,
And gaze upon her smile;
Seem as you drank the very air
........................
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Comments about Revenge by Letitia Elizabeth Landon

  • Rookie - 275 Points Peter Bolton (6/7/2015 10:01:00 AM)

    Simple and sentimental must be the most puerile and inane criticism ever aimed at a poet. In this age of novelties, we should not forget that Landon was startlingly original, of internationally fame and hugely influential. One might accept the combination of 'cold and sentimental' and 'flat and intense'. That intensity is certainly evident in 'Revenge' but it is not unusual and the powerful undercurrents in her work are not that difficult to spot. (Report) Reply

    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • Rookie - 0 Points Success Shaibu (6/16/2014 11:25:00 AM)

    what the he? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ! (Report) Reply

  • Gold Star - 31,888 Points Gangadharan Nair Pulingat (6/16/2014 3:50:00 AM)

    And swear as your heart is as a shrine wonderful poem and recited it. (Report) Reply

  • Gold Star - 16,990 Points * Sunprincess * (6/5/2014 7:42:00 AM)

    ........truly a great write....now she feels revenged....after giving him her heart
    and he smashed it to pieces....for she knows he isn't loved as well....
    ~'Tis well: I am revenged at last,
    Mark you that scornful cheek,
    The eye averted as you pass'd,
    Spoke more than words could speak.
    .....and the last line says it all
    ~For thou art nor beloved. ~ (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Jo''el Madore (3/25/2014 7:21:00 PM)

    In response to Greg Hutchinson: the correct word is not. At some point, a typo occurred and has continued. See page 135 of _The Poetical Works of Miss Landon: Complete_ published in 1839. You can find it via a Google search: google books complete works of miss landon. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Jo''el Madore (3/25/2014 7:18:00 PM)

    In response to Greg Hutchinson: The correct word is not. At some point, a typo occurred and has continued. See page 135 of _The Poetical Works of Miss Landon: Complete_ published in 1839. You can find it via google: search google books complete works of miss landon (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Jo''el Madore (3/25/2014 7:18:00 PM)

    In response to Greg Hutchinson: The correct word is not. At some point, a typo occurred and has continued. See page 135 of _The Poetical Works of Miss Landon: Complete_ published in 1839. You can find it via google: search google books complete works of miss landon (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Jo''el Madore (3/25/2014 7:17:00 PM)

    In response to Greg Hutchinson: The correct word is not. At some point, a typo occurred and has continued. See page 135 of _The Poetical Works of Miss Landon: Complete_ published in 1839. You can find it via google: search google books complete works of miss landon (Report) Reply

  • Gold Star - 5,272 Points Is It Poetry (6/16/2013 9:48:00 AM)

    Instead of.
    All that you taught my heart to bear.
    To,
    all that you may know. (Report) Reply

  • Gold Star - 17,732 Points Ramesh Rai (6/16/2013 7:14:00 AM)

    beautiful creation. lovely write (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Greg Hutchinson (6/16/2012 9:24:00 PM)

    (If this turns out to be a repetition, I'm sorry. I wrote the comment earlier and then had to renew my password.) Shouldn't the penultimate word be not rather than nor? There is nothing odd (poetic though it is) about the diction of the rest of the poem, but For thou art NOR beloved seems meaningless, while For thou art NOT beloved is quite natural. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Alex Marunde (6/16/2010 8:40:00 PM)

    Revenge comes at a price, thou wishes to punish thy for his mortal sins when one considers the uncontrolable pain he has brought apon thou heart. For this you will enjoy a moment of shine but only to be filled with an eturnal rhym of why did I? A beautiful poem, consider that revenge isn't always the answer, turn to the open hearts of your loved ones and you will find a way, I promise you this. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 9 Points Herman Chiu (6/16/2010 8:33:00 PM)

    I thought it was a typical revengeful poem... until I got near the end.
    And then I got to the end. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 322 Points Manonton Dalan (6/16/2010 5:55:00 PM)

    it's so real for me. (Report) Reply

  • Bronze Star - 2,518 Points Ramesh T A (6/16/2010 6:52:00 AM)

    Civilised way of taking revenge is well expressed in this nice poem! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Kevin Straw (6/16/2010 6:05:00 AM)

    An excellent poem. Her natural wish for revenge begins to dissipate as she begins to feel pity for the man who so wronged her. Should the last line be “For thou art NOT beloved.”? I do not understand it otherwise. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Courtney Wills (6/16/2010 4:02:00 AM)

    I love it! He broke her heart and now his will be just as broken. A 'fitting revenge', as she said. I know just how she feels! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 0 Points Michael Harmon (6/16/2009 5:19:00 PM)

    I. Argumentum ad Hominem (abusive and circumstantial) : the fallacy of attacking the character or circumstances of an individual who is advancing a statement or an argument instead of trying to disprove the truth of the statement or the soundness of the argument. Often the argument is characterized simply as a personal attack.
    A. The personal attack is also often termed an 'ad personem argument': the statement or argument at issue is dropped from consideration or is ignored, and the locutor's character or circumstances are used to influence opinion.
    B. The fallacy draws its appeal from the technique of 'getting personal.' The assumption is that what the locutor is saying is entirely or partially dictated by his character or special circumstances and so should be disregarded.
    http: //philosophy.lander.edu/logic/person.html (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Michael Pruchnicki (6/16/2009 4:28:00 PM)

    Let us welcome with open arms the latest convert to feminism - Michael Harmon who cites Wikipedia as a source for his comment on a poet he admits is 'simple and sentimental'! Of course, as a male admirer of poets like John Donne, how can I argue with such drivel as the theory that her poetry allows for 'multiple, concurrent levels of meaning'!

    Personally, I find such an interpretation offensive to my tender sensibilities,170 or 200 years from now! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 0 Points Michael Harmon (6/16/2009 2:45:00 PM)

    an excerpt from Wikipedia on Letitia Elizabeth Landon:

    Critical Reputation
    Among the poets of her time to recognise and admire her were Elizabeth Barrett Browning, who wrote 'L.E.L.'s Last Question' in homage, and Christina Rossetti, who published a tribute poem entitled 'L.E.L' in her 1866 volume 'The Prince's Progress and Other Poems.'

    Her reputation, while high in the 19th century, fell during most of the 20th as literary fashions changed. and Landon's poetry was perceived as overly simple and sentimental. In recent years, however, scholars and critics have increasingly studied her work, beginning with Germaine Greer [3] in the 1970s. Critics such as Isobel Armstrong argue that the seeming simplicity of poetry such as Landon's is deceptive, and that women poets of the 19th century often employed a method of writing which allows for multiple, concurrent levels of meaning. [4]

    * * *

    Personally, if my poems were being talked about 170 years from now, I would be quite pleased. [MH] (Report) Reply










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