Treasure Island

Letitia Elizabeth Landon

(1802-1838 / England)

Previous Month June 2014 Next Month
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
26 27 28 29 30 31 1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 1 2 3 4 5 6
Poem of the Day
Select a day from the calendar.
Would you like to see the poem of the day in your e-mail box every morning?
Your email address:
  Subscribe FREE
  Unsubscribe

Revenge


Ay, gaze upon her rose-wreathed hair,
And gaze upon her smile;
Seem as you drank the very air
Her breath perfumed the while:

And wake for her the gifted line,
That wild and witching lay,
And swear your heart is as a shrine,
That only owns her sway.

'Tis well: I am revenged at last,—
Mark you that scornful cheek,—
The eye averted as you pass'd,
Spoke more than words could speak.

Ay, now by all the bitter tears
That I have shed for thee,—
The racking doubts, the burning fears,—
Avenged they well may be—

By the nights pass'd in sleepless care,
The days of endless woe;
All that you taught my heart to bear,
All that yourself will know.

I would not wish to see you laid
Within an early tomb;
I should forget how you betray'd,
And only weep your doom:

But this is fitting punishment,
To live and love in vain,—
Oh my wrung heart, be thou content,
And feed upon his pain.

Go thou and watch her lightest sigh,—
Thine own it will not be;
And bask beneath her sunny eye,—
It will not turn on thee.

'Tis well: the rack, the chain, the wheel,
Far better hadst thou proved;
Ev'n I could almost pity feel,
For thou art nor beloved.

Submitted: Tuesday, December 31, 2002
Edited: Saturday, June 16, 2012

Do you like this poem?
0 person liked.
0 person did not like.

Read poems about / on: rose, hair, smile, pain, heart, fear

Read this poem in other languages

This poem has not been translated into any other language yet.

I would like to translate this poem »

word flags

What do you think this poem is about?

Comments about this poem (Revenge by Letitia Elizabeth Landon )

Enter the verification code :

  • * Sunprincess * (6/5/2014 7:42:00 AM)

    ........truly a great write....now she feels revenged....after giving him her heart
    and he smashed it to pieces....for she knows he isn't loved as well....
    ~'Tis well: I am revenged at last,
    Mark you that scornful cheek,
    The eye averted as you pass'd,
    Spoke more than words could speak.
    .....and the last line says it all
    ~For thou art nor beloved. ~ (Report) Reply

  • Jo''el Madore (3/25/2014 7:21:00 PM)

    In response to Greg Hutchinson: the correct word is not. At some point, a typo occurred and has continued. See page 135 of _The Poetical Works of Miss Landon: Complete_ published in 1839. You can find it via a Google search: google books complete works of miss landon. (Report) Reply

  • Jo''el Madore (3/25/2014 7:18:00 PM)

    In response to Greg Hutchinson: The correct word is not. At some point, a typo occurred and has continued. See page 135 of _The Poetical Works of Miss Landon: Complete_ published in 1839. You can find it via google: search google books complete works of miss landon (Report) Reply

  • Jo''el Madore (3/25/2014 7:18:00 PM)

    In response to Greg Hutchinson: The correct word is not. At some point, a typo occurred and has continued. See page 135 of _The Poetical Works of Miss Landon: Complete_ published in 1839. You can find it via google: search google books complete works of miss landon (Report) Reply

  • Jo''el Madore (3/25/2014 7:17:00 PM)

    In response to Greg Hutchinson: The correct word is not. At some point, a typo occurred and has continued. See page 135 of _The Poetical Works of Miss Landon: Complete_ published in 1839. You can find it via google: search google books complete works of miss landon (Report) Reply

  • Greg Hutchinson (6/16/2012 9:24:00 PM)

    (If this turns out to be a repetition, I'm sorry. I wrote the comment earlier and then had to renew my password.) Shouldn't the penultimate word be not rather than nor? There is nothing odd (poetic though it is) about the diction of the rest of the poem, but For thou art NOR beloved seems meaningless, while For thou art NOT beloved is quite natural. (Report) Reply

  • Alex Marunde (6/16/2010 8:40:00 PM)

    Revenge comes at a price, thou wishes to punish thy for his mortal sins when one considers the uncontrolable pain he has brought apon thou heart. For this you will enjoy a moment of shine but only to be filled with an eturnal rhym of why did I? A beautiful poem, consider that revenge isn't always the answer, turn to the open hearts of your loved ones and you will find a way, I promise you this. (Report) Reply

  • Herman Chiu (6/16/2010 8:33:00 PM)

    I thought it was a typical revengeful poem... until I got near the end.
    And then I got to the end. (Report) Reply

  • Kevin Straw (6/16/2010 6:05:00 AM)

    An excellent poem. Her natural wish for revenge begins to dissipate as she begins to feel pity for the man who so wronged her. Should the last line be “For thou art NOT beloved.”? I do not understand it otherwise. (Report) Reply

  • Courtney Wills (6/16/2010 4:02:00 AM)

    I love it! He broke her heart and now his will be just as broken. A 'fitting revenge', as she said. I know just how she feels! (Report) Reply

  • Michael Harmon (6/16/2009 5:19:00 PM)

    I. Argumentum ad Hominem (abusive and circumstantial) : the fallacy of attacking the character or circumstances of an individual who is advancing a statement or an argument instead of trying to disprove the truth of the statement or the soundness of the argument. Often the argument is characterized simply as a personal attack.
    A. The personal attack is also often termed an 'ad personem argument': the statement or argument at issue is dropped from consideration or is ignored, and the locutor's character or circumstances are used to influence opinion.
    B. The fallacy draws its appeal from the technique of 'getting personal.' The assumption is that what the locutor is saying is entirely or partially dictated by his character or special circumstances and so should be disregarded.
    http: //philosophy.lander.edu/logic/person.html (Report) Reply

  • Michael Pruchnicki (6/16/2009 4:28:00 PM)

    Let us welcome with open arms the latest convert to feminism - Michael Harmon who cites Wikipedia as a source for his comment on a poet he admits is 'simple and sentimental'! Of course, as a male admirer of poets like John Donne, how can I argue with such drivel as the theory that her poetry allows for 'multiple, concurrent levels of meaning'!

    Personally, I find such an interpretation offensive to my tender sensibilities,170 or 200 years from now! (Report) Reply

  • Michael Harmon (6/16/2009 2:45:00 PM)

    an excerpt from Wikipedia on Letitia Elizabeth Landon:

    Critical Reputation
    Among the poets of her time to recognise and admire her were Elizabeth Barrett Browning, who wrote 'L.E.L.'s Last Question' in homage, and Christina Rossetti, who published a tribute poem entitled 'L.E.L' in her 1866 volume 'The Prince's Progress and Other Poems.'

    Her reputation, while high in the 19th century, fell during most of the 20th as literary fashions changed. and Landon's poetry was perceived as overly simple and sentimental. In recent years, however, scholars and critics have increasingly studied her work, beginning with Germaine Greer [3] in the 1970s. Critics such as Isobel Armstrong argue that the seeming simplicity of poetry such as Landon's is deceptive, and that women poets of the 19th century often employed a method of writing which allows for multiple, concurrent levels of meaning. [4]

    * * *

    Personally, if my poems were being talked about 170 years from now, I would be quite pleased. [MH] (Report) Reply

  • Kevin Straw (6/16/2009 5:39:00 AM)

    A woman scorned! Only a woman could write so fiendishly. Donne's 'When by thy scorn, o murd'ress I am dead...' is only a tenth as bitter. (Report) Reply

Read all 21 comments »

Top Poems

  1. Phenomenal Woman
    Maya Angelou
  2. The Road Not Taken
    Robert Frost
  3. If You Forget Me
    Pablo Neruda
  4. Still I Rise
    Maya Angelou
  5. Dreams
    Langston Hughes
  6. Annabel Lee
    Edgar Allan Poe
  7. If
    Rudyard Kipling
  8. Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
    Robert Frost
  9. I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings
    Maya Angelou
  10. Invictus
    William Ernest Henley

PoemHunter.com Updates

New Poems

  1. Please Remember, abigail sikwenda
  2. So near, yet so far..., Musical Ravi
  3. Shackled by Love, Maheshwer Peri
  4. Lackadaisical, Diane Hine
  5. Ghost City, Cyndi K. Encinares Gacosta
  6. The fine things in life, Cyndi K. Encinares Gacosta
  7. Dead concern, hasmukh amathalal
  8. Your phallus is, Cyndi K. Encinares Gacosta
  9. rejection, Cyndi K. Encinares Gacosta
  10. All You Do Is Take, Lawrence S. Pertillar

Poem of the Day

poet George Gordon Byron

So we'll go no more a-roving
So late into the night,
Though the heart still be as loving,
And the moon still be as bright.

For the sword outwears its sheath,
...... Read complete »

 

Modern Poem

 

Member Poem

[Hata Bildir]