Rudyard Kipling

(30 December 1865 – 18 January 1936 / Bombay)

Previous Month May 2014 Next Month
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
29 30 31 1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31 1
Poem of the Day
Select a day from the calendar.
Would you like to see the poem of the day in your e-mail box every morning?
Your email address:
  Subscribe FREE
  Unsubscribe

Our Lady of the Sackcloth


There was a Priest at Philae,
Tongue-tied, feeble, and old;
And the daily prayer to the Virgin
Was all the Office he could.

The others were ill-remembered,
Mumbled and hard to hear;
But to Mary, the two-fold Virgin,
Always his voice rang clear.

And the congregation mocked him,
And the weight of the years he bore,
And they sent word to the Bishop
That he should not serve them more.

(Never again at the Offering
When the Bread and the Body are one:
Oh, never the picture of Mary
Watching him serve her Son!)

Kindly and wise was the Bishop.
Unto the Priest said he: -
“Patience till thou art stronger,
And keep meantime with me.

“Patience a little; it may be
The Lord shall loosen thy tongue
And then thou shalt serve at the Offering
As it was when we were young.”

And the Priest obeyed and was silent,
And the Bishop gave him leave
To walk alone in the desert
Where none should see him grieve.

(Never again at the Offering
When the Wine and the Blood are one!
Oh, never the picture of Mary
Watching him honour her Son!)

Saintly and clean was the Bishop,
Ruling himself aright
With prayer and fast in the daytime
And scourge and vigil at night.

Out of his zeal he was minded
To add one penance the more –
A garment of harshest sackcloth
Under the robes he wore.

He gathered the cloth in secret
Lest any should know and praise –
The shears, the palm and the packthread –
And laboured it many ways.

But he had no skill in the making,
And failed and fretted the while;
Till the stood a Woman before him,
Smiling as Mothers smile.

Her feet were burned by the desert –
Like a desert-dweller she trod –
Even the two-fold Virgin,
Spouse and Bearer of God!

She took the shears and the sacking,
The needle and stubborn thread,
She cut, she shaped, and she sewed them,
And, “This shall be blessed,” she said.

She passed in the white hot noontide,
On a wave of the quivering air;
And the Bishop’s eyes were opened,
And he fell on his face in prayer.

But – far from the smouldering censers –
Far from the chanted praise –
Oh, far from the pictures of Mary
That had watched him all his days –

Far in the desert by Philae
The old Priest walked forlorn,
Till he saw in the head of her Riders
A Queen of the Desert-born.

High she swayed on her camel,
Beautiful to behold:
And her beast was belled with silver,
And her veils were spotted with gold!

Low she leaned from her litter –
Soft she spoke in his ear: -
“Nay, I have watched thy sorrow!
Nay, but the end is near!

“For again thou shalt serve at the Offering
And thy tongue shall be loosed in praise,
And again thou shalt sing unto Mary
Who has watched thee all thy days.

“Go in peace to the Bishop,
Carry him word from me –
That the Woman who sewed the sackcloth
Would have him set thee free!”

Submitted: Monday, May 14, 2012
Edited: Monday, May 14, 2012

Do you like this poem?
0 person liked.
0 person did not like.

What do you think this poem is about?



Read this poem in other languages

This poem has not been translated into any other language yet.

I would like to translate this poem »

word flags

What do you think this poem is about?

Comments about this poem (Our Lady of the Sackcloth by Rudyard Kipling )

Enter the verification code :

  • Ramesh T A (5/15/2013 2:52:00 PM)

    Kipling's sense of Christian feeling is beautifully conveyed in this fine poem! Patience of the meek never goes waste indeed! Reading this poem one has to feel so! (Report) Reply

  • Bill Grace (5/15/2013 12:03:00 PM)

    For those of Roman Catholic background more power than for those who do not understand the figure of Mary. Carl Jung would approve. Bill Grace (Report) Reply

  • Phyllis T. Halle (5/15/2012 1:50:00 PM)

    I had never read this most beautiful, most perfect, most touching poem! And now I am so happy that you provided me with the opportunity to know its profound beauty! (Report) Reply

Read all 4 comments »

New Poems

  1. Jenin, Nathalie Handal
  2. Even, Nathalie Handal
  3. Haiku A Child's Eyes, Kwai Chee Low
  4. The Hawk Quartet, Nathalie Handal
  5. Do I?, Aparna Chatterjee
  6. Haiku Strangers, Kwai Chee Low
  7. LIMERICK, Philo Yan
  8. Intermisión, Nathalie Handal
  9. The Single Christmas, Bob Fletcher
  10. Consolation, Aparna Chatterjee

Poem of the Day

poet Sir John Suckling

Dost see how unregarded now
That piece of beauty passes?
There was a time when I did vow
To that alone;
But mark the fate of faces;
...... Read complete »

 

Modern Poem

poet Elizabeth Bishop

 

Member Poem

Trending Poems

  1. Still I Rise, Maya Angelou
  2. Daffodils, William Wordsworth
  3. Sonnet I, Sir John Suckling
  4. Death is Nothing at All, Henry Scott Holland
  5. Being With You, Heather Burns
  6. The Road Not Taken, Robert Frost
  7. Fire and Ice, Robert Frost
  8. If You Forget Me, Pablo Neruda
  9. A Poison Tree, William Blake
  10. Phenomenal Woman, Maya Angelou

Trending Poets

[Hata Bildir]