William Ernest Henley

(1849 - 1902 / Gloucester / England)

Invictus


Out of the night that covers me,
Black as the Pit from pole to pole,
I thank whatever gods may be
........................
........................
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  • Rookie Aaaqil Medalla (2/17/2014 2:34:00 AM)

    Soccer is so fun,
    I kick the ball and run,
    I score and it is now 1 to none,
    I can't believe on what ive done,
    Times up we won! (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Aaaqil Medalla (2/4/2014 6:47:00 PM)

    Glitches with no witches
    Games have scary witches,
    That don’t need scary witches.
    Some games are for kids,
    That don’t need to be in Madrid.
    In Mario three scary figures will appear,
    And the figures will not flee like fear.
    In a game called Half-Life,
    Will scare you like a bread knife.
    Zombies in Half-Life say something unhuman.
    Reverse it and the zombies say this
    “GOD HELP ME! GOD HELP! ”
    It will scare you like a toddler’s yelp.
    In a game called Paranormal,
    The game is so unnormal.
    Look in a cracked wall,
    You see a bunny on a bed,
    It is funny on your head.
    Look again,
    And the bunny looks at you.
    There is a game called Black Ops,
    Get a sniper,
    Scope up,
    And see a face appear. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Aaaqil Medalla (2/3/2014 9:07:00 PM)

    Invictus

    Out of the night that covers me,
    Black as the Pit from pole to pole,
    I thank whatever gods may be
    For my unconquerable soul.

    In the fell clutch of circumstance
    I have not winced nor cried aloud.
    Under the bludgeonings of chance
    My head is bloody, but unbowed.

    Beyond this place of wrath and tears
    Looms but the Horror of the shade,
    And yet the menace of the years
    Finds, and shall find, me unafraid.

    It matters not how strait the gate,
    How charged with punishments the scroll.
    I am the master of my fate:
    I am the captain of my soul.
    William Ernest Henley (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 1 Points Charles Monroe (12/29/2013 1:12:00 PM)

    ”For the Gangster Sh_t I do

    Mother Earth and Father Time
    Listen to your Children’s rhyme
    Hoping prayer can get me through
    All the Gangster Shit I do.

    Word to Wordsworth, word to Keats
    Hieroglyphs within my sheets
    Word to Gorky, Word to Pablo
    Word to Diego, and Leonardo
    I am the result of those
    Of whom Time and Nature chose.

    Word to Juana word to Sylvia
    Word to Sandra and Virginia
    Word to Maya Angelou
    My graffiti Popol Vuh,
    Hope the Universe forgive me
    For the Gangster shit I do.

    P.X
    12.30.13
    ... Imperium (Report) Reply

  • Freshman - 1,353 Points Kay Staley (12/26/2013 7:18:00 PM)

    Very well written to inspire the reader to question whether they indeed are their own master. The allusive imagery is very powerful creating a dark background for the words to fall upon. It starts with terror and ends with the idea of being the conquer which makes it want the typical American would find useful to apply to themselves. (Report) Reply

  • Freshman - 1,871 Points Elizabeth Padillo Olesen (12/18/2013 9:47:00 AM)

    I continue to find this poem very arresting and beautiful. Very inspirational to see the courage ahd conviction unfolding But in the end, can we really say that we are the master of our soul when death calls us? (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 421 Points Shahzia Batool (12/18/2013 12:28:00 AM)

    a strong voice of an unconquered soul...a strong poem and a must read...it added Invictus to my vocab too... (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Malelega Kirwan (12/7/2013 3:10:00 PM)

    Beautiful poem and seen the fantastic movie about Nelson Mandela.May you rest in peace Madiba. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Edward Webb (12/6/2013 8:05:00 PM)

    This poem shows that even in death there is a victory,
    WHAT EVER HAPPENS IN LIFE YOUR SOUL CANNOT BE CHANGED,
    The final lines have the importance of drawing it back to I (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Jessica Mcquistan (12/1/2013 3:50:00 PM)

    I feel that Henley is trying to say that even though there is a lot of hardships in life we are the ones who have the strength to perservere through it all. Hence the part that says I am the master of my fate
    I am the captain of my soul (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 378 Points Krishnakumar Chandrasekar Nair (10/23/2013 5:28:00 AM)

    Beyond this place of joy or fears
    Transient, there is a place
    Where no more are we puppets of fate
    And dwell eternal in love and grace.....

    (Everybody welcome to my page) (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 0 Points Colin Beard (10/17/2013 12:27:00 PM)

    To put to rest all of the religious/ anti-religious debate over the poem, can I just ask one question? Does it really matter? I consider myself a religious person, but even I recognize this as one of the most powerful and influential poems ever written. However, if we were to truly understand the meaning of this poem, we must take into consideration what Henley meant by the word, soul. If you look over his biography, you learn that he suffered many hardships in his life including the death of his six year old daughter as well as an amputation. Yet despite the many trials of life, he was able to prevail. I think he meant by soul that we, as humans, have the unique ability to overcome any obstacle, despite the fell clutch of circumstance, whether this ability was given to us from God or not. And that we, being the captain of our fate have complete control over the choices that we make, which will inevitably control the course of our destiny. So really, i don't believe that this poem is religious or anti-religious, but rather it is neutral. But what do I know? I'm just a high-school teenager. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Alaa Hussain (10/12/2013 7:22:00 PM)

    (Days) apologized to me a friend and
    said, I've missed the old days very
    simple words routine life fixed
    principles do not budge the rest of the
    time to renew and promised era and
    tender (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Kedo Nako (10/8/2013 3:50:00 PM)

    my gf's aunt just got an awesome 6 month old Volkswagen Touareg by working parttime off of a pc. Read Full Report http: //www.jobs64.com (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Daniel Carhart (10/6/2013 9:58:00 PM)

    I first read this poem about 1955, I committed it to memory almost at once. I think of it often and recite it to myself frequently, as I do I find that I have an almost constant revision of my understanding of the words, if I live to be 100, I may eventually be able to encompass its' total meaning, if I do not it will have been time well spent, I have nothing but the deepest admiration for Henley's provocative words. (Report) Reply

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