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Thomas Hardy

(2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928 / Dorchester / England)

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I Need Not Go


I need not go
Through sleet and snow
To where I know
........................
........................
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7 person liked.
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Comments about this poem (I Need Not Go by Thomas Hardy )

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  • Rookie - 802 Points Francis Lynch (2/23/2014 10:33:00 PM)

    The passage of years is evident, and the lover will one day lie side of his sured love. She is not with his company, he has not denied himself a life without her, and he is not ashamed of this. But, the one he loved will always be waiting. He needed go, time will eventually lead him there. Such subtle praise of our living world and one's regret to leave our sensual pleasures. Hardy. Gotta love the Jude in him. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 272 Points Stephen W (2/23/2014 6:16:00 PM)

    A clue! 'By cypress sough'. Cypresses are popular cemetery trees, by tradition. Almost certainly he is visiting a grave. She will not chide, but he wishes she still could. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 272 Points Stephen W (2/23/2014 6:12:00 PM)

    I agree that this is an ironic poem. It's possible the 'lover' is either not human, as some have suggested, or dead. He might be visiting a grave. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 857 Points Liliana ~el (2/23/2014 4:39:00 PM)

    Such certainty in the devotion and depth of love
    Assured, confident, leisurely (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 8 Points Thomas Vaughan Jones (2/23/2014 1:45:00 PM)

    Not to my personal taste. I'm afraid that this is what gets rhymers a bad name. The end rhymes are forced, the scansion non existent. He has written world famous novels and produced some fine poetry. There are better examples of his work elsewhere in PH. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 175 Points Vizard Dhawan (2/23/2014 7:03:00 AM)

    love this poem, though to my eye, the
    language drips with ironic intent. No
    long left love will simply excuse the
    litany of lies the central character
    rehearses to himself (Report) Reply

  • Rookie iain Saunders (2/23/2012 3:05:00 AM)

    I love this poem, though to my eye, the language drips with ironic intent. No long left love will simply excuse the litany of lies the central character rehearses to himself. Of course she will 'upbraid' and 'blame' him, but he is so caught up in his 'company', his 'world' his 'stress and strain' that he pushes the romantic ideal his love seeks further aside - never abandoning it, for that would engender too much guilt, but simply procrastinating the idyllic moment 'by Cypress sough' (i.e. a scene underneath the gentle whistle of wind through the branches of a Cypress tree) that seem less and less real. The character's love is doomed, but he does not know it yet and the pathos in the last line 'but suffer it so' seems to reflect his future doom brought on by this way of thinking. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Ossai Micheal (2/23/2011 10:54:00 PM)

    Too lovely. The poem is all abount a man that trust is lover to the call. Not minding the distance he still believe is love will wait. Unlike the love we have these days we hardly trust each other. But in these poem the love was exagerated. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Joey Valenzuela (2/23/2010 8:02:00 PM)

    yeah this is likely a waiting love....

    in the first stanza, it is presented that the narrator's sure that she waits for him...and though they're far he's sure he's still inlove with her....


    in the second stanza, the arrangement of words, according to the international english, is not quite bearable (although it's a poetic license) but the meaning is clear...

    the narrator tried to say that when she got tired of waiting him, he could present himself to her tell her he still love her, so that she may not think he'd forgotten her.

    third stanza is like presenting the power of the woman to chide him if he'd forgotten to visit her (though the truth is he missed her so)

    it's like the narrator is saying that he may get tired of waiting, or maybe they both could go tired of waiting and it's not their fault they can't blame themselves...maybe because they aggreed to wait each other, and they knew that their feelings may change along the way...


    hehehehe...that's my interpretation...hope i made sense... (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Terence George Craddock (2/23/2010 10:13:00 AM)

    Beautiful simple flowing lines, apparently he is more casual in the relationship than she, however a hint of her displeasure if he takes her for granted, and his undecided feelings; give the future of the relationship an inquisitive contemplative open ending, the reader can wander in at will. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Joseph Poewhit (2/23/2010 6:52:00 AM)

    Most women want attention from their lover. If cares take the place, you know? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Kevin Straw (2/23/2010 6:00:00 AM)

    On the face of it an unpleasant poem. But it should be remembered that the person in the poem is not Hardy himself. The power of the poet is in his imaginative reach. He is able to reflect experiences he himself has not had. We do not think Shakespeare's amazing creation of a young girl in love in Romeo and Juliet is autobiographical. To infer autobiography from a poem is to mistake the nature of poetry. In this poem Hardy paints a picture of a type of man, not of himself. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 294 Points Ramesh T A (2/23/2010 1:39:00 AM)

    The confidence about his love is boldly revealed in this poem! Rather the overconfidence he has makes us laugh at Hardy! This is called cocksure conviction! But fate has got its own design which he will know later! (Report) Reply

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