John Keats

(31 October 1795 – 23 February 1821 / London, England)

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Fancy



Ever let the Fancy roam,
Pleasure never is at home:
........................
........................
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Comments about this poem (Fancy by John Keats )

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  • * Sunprincess * (1/17/2014 8:23:00 PM)

    ........I see a lot of work went into this poem...wonder how long it took him to write this one...
    ...................it's a fine creation... (Report) Reply

  • Thomas Vaughan Jones (1/17/2014 7:58:00 AM)

    At the risk of sounding like a philistine I have to say that this is not one of Keat's finest. It lacks assonance and the rhyme is extremely forced. He might have scribbled this on the back of a Greek Urn while he was waiting for Autumn. Sorry. (Report) Reply

  • Merna Ibrahim (6/8/2010 10:52:00 AM)

    The poem is brilliant and the rhyme as well! !
    I salute you for your perfect poems.... (Report) Reply

  • Sylva Portoian (1/19/2010 2:49:00 AM)

    I love Your poems... Keat, but I analyze your poem in 'mine' way,
    Can you analyze this sentence in your way, please?
    ' Pleasure never is at Home' (Report) Reply

  • Ramesh T A (1/17/2010 1:37:00 AM)

    The fanciful roaming indeed gives joy of freedom as detailed by Keats! This reminds me of John Milton's L 'Allegro and Il Pensareso making survey of the world in Nature and human life fancifully and philosophically in wonderful immortal poems of all times! (Report) Reply

  • Herman Chiu (1/17/2010 1:32:00 AM)

    What more could someone say about pleasure?
    Fancy that - an explanation of a way of life Keats has thrown out in favor of freedom.
    Stunning descriptions! (Report) Reply

  • *Ordelia * (1/17/2006 7:53:00 AM)

    A beautiful poem by Keats, obviously inspired by Milton's poem duo L'Allegro
    and Il Penseroso. i; m much more inspired by the first stanza than the second, but just like in Milton's duo of poems, this seems to be portraying two different types of fancy for two different types of people.

    'These delights if thou canst give,
    Mirth, with thee I mean to live.'
    Milton, L'Allegro (Report) Reply

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