Sir John Carr

(1732-1807 / England)

Bamkruptcy Rendered Easy - Poem by Sir John Carr

The Cit, relying on his trade,
Which, like all other things, may fade,
Longs for a curricle and villa:
This Hatchet splendidly supplies,
The other Cock'ril builds, or buys,
To charm himself and Miss Hautilla.

Then swift, O London! he retires,
To be, from all thy smoke and spires,
From Saturday till Sunday, merry:
On Sunday crowds of friends attend;
His house and garden some commend,
And all admire his port and sherry.

His mistress urg'd him now to play,
And cut to wealth a shorter way,
Now as a bride she heads his table;
But still our Cit observ'd his time.
Returning at St. Cripple's chime,
At least as near as he was able.

But soon
could not bear the sight
Of town; for walls with bow'rs unite,
As well as smoke with country breezes;
Without the keenest grief and pride

could not quit his
, and
We yield as soon as passion seizes.

The clock no more his herald prov'd;
Tuesday, nay Wednesday, morn have mov'd,
Ere trembling shopmen saw their master:
Observing neighbours whisper'd round,
That ease might do, with plenty crown'd;
If not, that ruin came the faster.

His cash grew scarce, his business still,
At variance were his books and till
(For wolves devour when shepherds slumber);
His creditors around him pour,
Seize all his horses, household store,
And only give him up the lumber!

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Poem Submitted: Thursday, September 30, 2010

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