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(1770-1850 / Cumberland / England)

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A Narrow Girdle of Rough Stones and Crags

A narrow girdle of rough stones and crags,
A rude and natural causeway, interposed
Between the water and a winding slope
........................
........................
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Comments about this poem (A Poet's Epitaph by William Wordsworth )

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  • * Sunprincess * (9/4/2012 10:01:00 PM)

    It is a shame Wordsworth didn't offer the sick and worn down man some food and rest...If he did then I admire him.. :)

    2 person liked.
    3 person did not like.
  • Kevin Straw (9/4/2012 10:19:00 AM)

    What the place should have been called was A pound for charity. What a society that was when a man in such a state had no one to call on for help except the lake in which he, probably, fished in vain! And I have no doubt that he was immensely elevated by the sight of Wordsworth and Co staring at him as they rambled through the countryside whilst every one else was working their butts off! This thing the Romantics had for Nature was a towny's view, not a countryman's.

  • Arushi Thakur (9/4/2012 5:55:00 AM)

    Awesome poem I am using it for my recitation competition
    .

  • Douglas Scotney (12/31/2011 4:08:00 PM)

    In company of a different take
    The poet went out walking
    Down by Grasmere Lake.
    Dead calm the lake, no wind.

    With no Joanna to mock
    At the base of the rock,
    All three flew fancy free.
    William, Dorothy, STC
    Idled in the land of Poesy:
    Osmunda fern became
    A Naiad Queen,
    A fisherman miraged ahead
    Was Freedom at his leisure.
    But when up close, all fancies fled.
    Self-reproach replaced their pleasure.
    The fisherman was sick and gaunt,
    Freedom just a taunt.
    Dead the lake, no care.

    Point Rash-Judgement's what
    They named the spot.
    Had I put in my tuppence
    The point might be Comeuppance.

  • Ramesh T A (9/4/2011 1:42:00 PM)

    I feel I was also there to witness what the Nature poet has described in this poem of his own style and narration! A great model poet for all lovers of Nature like him in this world! Except him who else can be so keen and accurate to know all details and say interestingly for others too to vicariously enjoy what he has enjoyed then?

  • Raj Nandy (11/15/2009 7:28:00 AM)

    I am simply amused to see a so called 'intelligent' reader trying to give rating to this great classical poet Wordsworth! May be under the delusion that he/she could write better verse! Poems of great Classical Poets, including Shakespeare,
    are made available by Poemhunter.com, for us to read, learn & appreciate! Let
    us not perform the sacrilege of trying to rate them, for in doing so we will only reveal our immaturity and ignorance! - From an old student of English Literature!

  • Raman Savithiri (9/22/2009 1:16:00 AM)

    a true poet! not composing but pouring out!

  • Jimmy Wrangler (9/4/2009 3:40:00 PM)

    WOW... How many times has this proven to be so true! ! ! ! Wordsworth is a genius at getting you to look in a mirror!

  • Ravi A (9/4/2009 11:44:00 AM)

    Life is like this. Wordsworth has often captured the picture of that man who lives in singular circumstances (Lucy Gray, Solitary reaper etc) . Wordsworth's message to the world is that every such man has a tale to tell the world about his singular existence. Wordsworth is indeed a poet who hasn't missed the stream of humanity.

  • Kevin Straw (9/4/2009 8:20:00 AM)

    The Wordsworth homeward plods his weary way - worthy words indeed!

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