Michael Drayton

(1563 - 1631 / Warwickshire / England)

Quotations

  • ''Fair stood the wind for France,
    When we our sails advance,
    Nor now to prove our chance
    Longer will tarry;''
    Michael Drayton (1563-1631), British poet. Agincourt (l. 1-4). . . Family Book of Best Loved Poems, The. David L. George, ed. (1952) Doubleday & Company.
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  • ''Upon Saint Crispin's day
    Fought was this noble fray,
    Which fame did not delay
    To England to carry.
    On when shall Englishmen
    With such acts fill a pen,
    Or England breed again
    Such a King Harry?''
    Michael Drayton (1563-1631), British poet. Agincourt (l. 113-120). . . Family Book of Best Loved Poems, The. David L. George, ed. (1952) Doubleday & Company.
  • ''No far-fetched sigh shall ever wound my breast,
    Love from mine eye a tear shall never wring,
    Nor in Ah me's my whining sonnets dressed,
    A libertine, fantastically I sing.
    My verse is the true image of my mind,
    Ever in motion, still desiring change;''
    Michael Drayton (1563-1631), British poet. Idea (sonnet 1, l. 5-10). . . The Anchor Anthology of Sixteenth Century Verse. Richard Sylvester, ed. (1974) Doubleday/Anchor É Books.
  • ''Or if no thing but death will serve thy turn,
    Still thirsting for subversion of my state,
    Do what thou canst, raze, massacre, and burn,
    Let the world see the utmost of thy hate;''
    Michael Drayton (1563-1631), British poet. Idea (sonnet 63, l. 9-12). . . Sonnet, The; an Anthology. Robert M. Bender and Charles L. Squier, eds. (1987) Washington Square Press/Pocket Books.
  • ''Since there's no help, come let us kiss and part;
    Nay, I have done, you get no more of me,
    And I am glad, yea, glad with all my heart
    That thus so cleanly I myself can free;
    Shake hands for ever, cancel all our vows,
    And when we meet at any time again,
    Be it not seen in either of our brows
    That we one jot of former love retain.''
    Michael Drayton (1563-1631), British poet. Idea (sonnet 15, l. 1-8). . . Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse, The. E. K. Chambers, comp. (1932) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Dear, why should you command me to my rest,
    When now the night doth summon all to sleep?
    Methinks this time becometh lovers best;
    Night was ordained together friends to keep.
    How happy are all other living things,
    Which though the day disjoin by several flight,
    The quiet evening yet together brings,
    And each returns unto his love at night.''
    Michael Drayton (1563-1631), British poet. Idea (sonnet-11, l. 1-8). . . Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse, The. E. K. Chambers, comp. (1932) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Now if thou wouldst, when all have given him over,
    From death to life thou mightst him yet recover.''
    Michael Drayton (1563-1631), British poet. Idea (sonnet 10, l. 13-14). . . Anchor Anthology of Sixteenth-Century Verse, The. Richard S. Sylvester, ed. (1974) Doubleday Anchor Books.
  • ''An evil spirit, your beauty, haunts me still,
    Wherewith, alas! I have been long possessed,''
    Michael Drayton (1563-1631), British poet. Idea (sonnet 9, l. 1-2). . . Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse, The. E. K. Chambers, comp. (1932) Oxford University Press.
  • ''To nothing fitter can I thee compare
    Than to the son of some rich pennyfather,
    Who, having now brought on his end with care,
    Leaves to his son all he had heaped together;''
    Michael Drayton (1563-1631), British poet. Idea (sonnet 8, l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of Sixteenth Century Verse, The. E. K. Chambers, comp. (1932) Oxford University Press.
  • ''But you broke into heaven's immortal store,
    Where virtue, honor, wit, and beauty lay;
    Which taking thence you have escaped away,
    Yet stand as free as ere you did before;''
    Michael Drayton (1563-1631), British poet. Idea (sonnet 4, l. 9-12). . . Anchor Anthology of Sixteenth-Century Verse, The. Richard S. Sylvester, ed. (1974) Doubleday Anchor Books.

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Sonnet V: Nothing But No

Nothing but "No," and "Aye," and "Aye," and "No"?
How falls it out so strangely you reply?
I tell ye, Fair, I'll not be answer'd so,
With this affirming "No," denying "Aye."
I say, "I love," you slightly answer "Aye";
I say, "You love," you pule me out a "No";
I say, "I die," you echo me an "Aye";
"Save me," I cry, you sigh me out a "No";
Must woe and I have nought but "No" and "Aye"?

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