Treasure Island

Marianne Moore

(November 15, 1887 – February 5, 1972 / Kirkwood, Missouri)

Quotations

  • ''Victory won't come

    to me unless I go
    to it; a grape tendril
    ties a knot in knots till

    knotted thirty times,—''
    Marianne Moore (1887-1972), U.S. poet. Nevertheless (l. 21-25). . . The Complete Poems of Marianne Moore. (1981) Penguin Books.
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  • ''O to be a dragon
    a symbol of the power of Heaven—of silkworm
    size or immense; at times invisible. Felicitous phenomenon!''
    Marianne Moore (1887-1972), U.S. poet. "O To Be a Dragon," O To Be a Dragon (1959).
  • ''the small tuft of fronds or katydid legs above each eye, still
    numbering the units in each group;
    the shadbones regularly set about the mouth, to droop or rise''
    Marianne Moore (1887-1972), U.S. poet. Peter (l. 3-4). . . The Complete Poems of Marianne Moore. (1981) Penguin Books.
  • ''I, too, dislike it: there are things that are important beyond all
    this fiddle.''
    Marianne Moore (1887-1972), U.S. poet. Poetry (l. 1). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
  • ''the raw material of poetry in
    all its rawness and
    that which is on the other hand
    genuine, you are interested in poetry.''
    Marianne Moore (1887-1972), U.S. poet. Poetry (l. 25-28). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
  • ''the immovable critic twitching his skin like a horse that feels a
    flea,''
    Marianne Moore (1887-1972), U.S. poet. Poetry (l. 13). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
  • ''nor till the poets among us can be "literalists of the imagination"Mabove insolence and triviality and can present
    for inspection, "imaginary gardens with real toads in them," shall we have
    it.''
    Marianne Moore (1887-1972), U.S. poet. "Poetry," Selected Poems (1935).
  • ''nor till the poets among us can be
    literalists of
    the imagination—above
    insolence and triviality and can present

    for inspection, 'imaginary gardens with real toads in them',
    shall we have''
    Marianne Moore (1887-1972), U.S. poet. Poetry (l. 20-24). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
  • ''I see no reason for calling my work poetry except that there is no other category in which to put it.''
    Marianne Moore (1887-1972), U.S. poet. Quoted in New York Mirror (May 31, 1959). On accepting the National Book Award for poetry.
  • ''The deepest feeling always shows itself in silence;
    not in silence, but restraint.''
    Marianne Moore (1887-1972), U.S. poet. "Silence," Selected Poems (1935).

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The Steeple-Jack

Dürer would have seen a reason for living
in a town like this, with eight stranded whales
to look at; with the sweet sea air coming into your house
on a fine day, from water etched
with waves as formal as the scales
on a fish.

One by one in two's and three's, the seagulls keep
flying back and forth over the town clock,

[Hata Bildir]