Members Who Read Most Number Of Poems

Live Scores

Click here to see the rest of the list

(12 September 1907 – 3 September 1963 / Belfast)

Quotations

  • ''blind wantons like the gulls who scream
    And rip the edge off any ideal or dream.''
    Louis MacNeice (1907-1963), Anglo-Irish poet. Among These Turf-Stacks (l. 17-18). . . Oxford Book of Modern Verse, The, 1892-1935. William Butler Yeats, ed. (1936) Oxford University Press.
    23 person liked.
    11 person did not like.
  • ''a fortress against ideas and against the
    Shuddering insidious shock of the theory-vendors
    The little sardine men crammed in a monster toy
    Who tilt their aggregate beast against our crumbling Troy.''
    Louis MacNeice (1907-1963), Anglo-Irish poet. Among These Turf-Stacks (l. 9-12). . . Oxford Book of Modern Verse, The, 1892-1935. William Butler Yeats, ed. (1936) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Why do we like being Irish? Partly because
    It gives us a hold on the sentimental English
    As members of a world that never was,
    Baptized with fairy water;''
    Louis MacNeice (1907-1963), Anglo-Irish poet. Autumn Journal (XVI, l. 61-64). . . Contemporary Irish Poetry; an Anthology. Anthony Bradley, ed. (New and rev. ed., 1988) University of California Press.
  • ''And I envy the intransigence of my own
    Countrymen who shoot to kill and never
    See the victim's face become their own
    Or find his motive sabotage their motives.''
    Louis MacNeice (1907-1963), Anglo-Irish poet. Autumn Journal (XVI, l. 5-8). . . Contemporary Irish Poetry; an Anthology. Anthony Bradley, ed. (New and rev. ed., 1988) University of California Press.
  • ''she gives her children neither sense nor money
    Who slouch arouond the world with a gesture and a brogue
    And a faggot of useless memories.''
    Louis MacNeice (1907-1963), Anglo-Irish poet. Autumn Journal (XVI, l. 124-126). . . Contemporary Irish Poetry; an Anthology. Anthony Bradley, ed. (New and rev. ed., 1988) University of California Press.
  • ''A city built upon mud;
    A culture built upon profit;
    Free speech nipped in the bud,
    The minority always guilty.
    Why should I want to go back
    To you, Ireland, my Ireland?''
    Louis MacNeice (1907-1963), Anglo-Irish poet. Autumn Journal (XVI, l. 101-106). . . Contemporary Irish Poetry; an Anthology. Anthony Bradley, ed. (New and rev. ed., 1988) University of California Press.
  • ''Up the Rebels, To Hell with the Pope,
    And God Save—as you prefer—the King or Ireland.
    The land of scholars and saints:
    Scholars and saints my eye, the land of ambush,
    Purblind manifestoes, never-ending complaints,''
    Louis MacNeice (1907-1963), Anglo-Irish poet. Autumn Journal (XVI, l. 31-35). . . Contemporary Irish Poetry; an Anthology. Anthony Bradley, ed. (New and rev. ed., 1988) University of California Press.
  • ''It's no go the Government grants, it's no go the elections, Sit on your arse for fifty years and hang your hat on a pension.''
    Louis MacNeice (1907-1963), British poet. "Bagpipe Music," Earth Compels (1938).
  • ''It's no go the merry-go-round, it's no go the rickshaw
    All we want is a limousine and a ticket for the peepshow.''
    Louis MacNeice (1907-1963), Anglo-Irish poet. Bagpipe Music (l. 1-2). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.
  • ''It's no go the picture palace, it's no go the stadium,
    It's no go the country cot with a pot of pink geraniums.
    It's no go the Government grants, it's no go the elections,
    Sit on your arse for fifty years and hang your hat on a pension.''
    Louis MacNeice (1907-1963), Anglo-Irish poet. Bagpipe Music (l. 39-43). . . New Oxford Book of English Verse, The, 1250-1950. Helen Gardner, ed. (1972) Oxford University Press.

Read more quotations »

Autobiography

My father made the walls resound,
He wore his collar the wrong way round.

When I was five the black dreamscame;
Nothing after was quite the same.

When I woke they did not care;
Nobody, nobody was there.

[Hata Bildir]