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(1460 - 1529 / Norfolk, England)

Quotations

  • ''Gup, Christian Clout, gup, Jack of the Vale!
    With Mannerly Margery Milk and Ale.''
    John Skelton (1460?-1529), British poet. Mannerly Margery Mylk and Ale (l. 6-7). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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  • ''A phoenix it is
    This hearse that must bless
    With aromatic gums
    That cost great sums,
    The way of thurification
    To make a fumigation,
    Sweet of reflare,
    And redolent of air,''
    John Skelton (1460?-1529), British poet. Phyllyp Sparowe (l. 235-242). . . Oxford Book of Light Verse, The. W. H. Auden, ed. (1938) Oxford University Press.
  • ''The bird of Araby,
    That potentially
    May never die,''
    John Skelton (1460?-1529), British poet. Phyllyp Sparowe (l. 230-232). . . Oxford Book of Light Verse, The. W. H. Auden, ed. (1938) Oxford University Press.
  • ''And with the corner of a Creed,
    The more shall be your meed.''
    John Skelton (1460?-1529), British poet. Phyllyp Sparowe (l. 15-16). . . Oxford Book of Light Verse, The. W. H. Auden, ed. (1938) Oxford University Press.
  • ''There riseth a new creation
    Of the same fashion
    Without alteration,''
    John Skelton (1460?-1529), British poet. Phyllyp Sparowe (l. 258-260). . . Oxford Book of Light Verse, The. W. H. Auden, ed. (1938) Oxford University Press.
  • ''For the soul of Philip Sparrow
    That was late slain at Carrow,
    Among the Nunnes Black.''
    John Skelton (1460?-1529), British poet. Phyllyp Sparowe (l. 7-10). . . Oxford Book of Light Verse, The. W. H. Auden, ed. (1938) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Place bo!
    Who is there, who?''
    John Skelton (1460?-1529), British poet. Phyllyp Sparowe (l. 1-2). . . Oxford Book of Light Verse, The. W. H. Auden, ed. (1938) Oxford University Press.
  • ''My maiden Isabel,
    Reflaring rosabel.
    The fragrant camomel;
    The ruddy rosary,
    The sovereign rosemary,
    The pretty strawberry;
    The columbine, the nept,
    The jelofer well set,
    The proper violet:''
    John Skelton (1460?-1529), British poet. To Mistress Isabel Pennell (l. 4-12). . . Oxford Book of Light Verse, The. W. H. Auden, ed. (1938) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Merry Margaret,
    As midsummer flower,
    Gentle as falcon
    Or hawk of the tower:''
    John Skelton (1460?-1529), British poet. To Mistress Margaret Hussey (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''With margeran gentle,
    The flower of goodlihood,
    Embroidered the mantle
    Is of your maidenhood.''
    John Skelton (1460?-1529), British poet. To Mistress Margery Wentworth (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).

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With Lullay, Lullay

With lullay, lullay, like a child,
Thou sleepest too long, thou art beguiled!
"My darling dear, my daisy flower,
Let me," quoth he, "lie in your lap."
"Lie still," quoth she, "my paramour,
Lie still hardily, and take a nap."
His head was heavy, such was his hap,
All drowsy, dreaming, drowned in sleep,
That of his love he took no keep,

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