Treasure Island

John Milton

(9 December 1608 – 8 November 1674 / London, England)

Quotations

  • ''Thus Satan talking to his neerest Mate
    With Head up-lift above the wave, and Eyes
    That sparkling blaz'd, his other Parts besides
    Prone on the Flood, extended long and large
    Lay floating many a rood, in bulk as huge
    As whom the Fables name of monstrous size,
    Titanian, or Earth-born, that warr'd on Jove,
    Briarios or Typhon, whom the Den
    By ancient Tarsus held, or that Sea-beast
    Leviathan,''
    John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. I, l. 192-201). . . The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
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  • ''None can love freedom heartily, but good men; the rest love not freedom, but licence.''
    John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. repr. In Complete Prose Works of Milton, ed. Ernest Sirluck (1959). The Tenure of Kings and Magistrates (1649).
  • ''Thus roving on
    In confus'd march forlorn, th' adventrous Bands,
    With shuddring horror pale, and eyes agast
    View'd first thir lamentable lot, and found
    No rest: through many a dark and drearie Vale
    They pass'd, and many a Region dolorous,
    O'er many a Frozen, many a fierie Alpe,
    Rocks, Caves, Lakes, Fens, Bogs, Dens, and shades of death,
    A Universe of death, which God by curse
    Created evil, for evil only good,
    Where all life dies, death lives, and Nature breeds,
    Perverse, all monstrous, all prodigious things,
    Abominable, inutterable, and worse
    Than Fables yet have feign'd, or fear conceiv'd,
    Gorgons and Hydras, and Chimeras dire.''
    John Milton (1608-1674), British oet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. II, l. 614-628). OBS. The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
  • ''No man who knows aught, can be so stupid to deny that all men naturally were born free.''
    John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. repr. In Complete Prose Works of Milton, ed. Ernest Sirluck (1959). The Tenure of Kings and Magistrates (1649).
  • ''So having said, a while he stood, expecting
    Their universal shout and high applause
    To fill his ear; when contrary, he hears,
    On all sides, from innumerable tongues
    A dismal universal hiss, the sound
    Of public scorn.''
    John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost, bk. 10, l. 504-9 (1667).
  • ''To measure life learn thou betimes, and know
    Toward solid good what leads the nearest way;
    For other things mild Heaven a time ordains,

    And disapproves that care, though wise in show,
    That with superfluous burden loads the day,
    And, when God sends a cheerful hour, refrains.''
    John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. To Cyriack Skinner (l. 9-14). . . The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
  • ''Hail wedded love, mysterious law, true source
    Of human offspring, sole propriety,
    In paradise of all things common else.
    By thee adulterous lust was driven from men
    Among the bestial herds to range, by thee
    Founded in reason, loyal, just, and pure,
    Relations dear, and all the charities
    Of father, son, and brother first were known.
    Far be it, that I should write thee sin or blame,
    Of think thee unbefitting holiest place,
    Perpetual fountain of domestic sweets,
    Whose bed is undefiled and chaste pronounced,
    Present, or past, as saints and patriarchs used.
    Here love his golden shafts employs, here lights
    His constant lamp, and waves his purple wings,
    Reigns here and revels; not in the bought smile
    Of harlots, loveless, joyless, unendeared,
    Casual fruition, nor in court amours
    Mixed dance, or wanton mask, or midnight ball,
    Or serenade, which the starved lover sings
    To his proud fair, best quitted with disdain.
    These lulled by Nightingales embracing slept,
    And on their naked limbs the flowery roof
    Showered roses, which the morn repaired. Sleep on,
    Blest pair; and O yet happiest if ye seek
    No happier state, and know to know no more.''
    John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. IV, l. 750-775). . . The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
  • ''What neat repast shall feast us, light and choice,
    Of Attick tast, with Wine, whence we may rise
    To hear the Lute well toucht, or artfull voice
    Warble immortal Notes and Tuskan Ayre?
    He who of those delights can judge, and spare
    To interpose them oft, is not unwise.''
    John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. To Mr. Lawrence (l. 9-14). . . The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
  • ''And God said, Let the waters generate,
    Reptile with spawn abundant, living soul:
    And let fowl fly above the earth, with wings
    Displayed on the open firmament of heaven.
    And God created the great whales, and each
    Soul living, each that crept, which plenteously
    The waters generated by their kinds,
    And every bird of wing after his kind;
    And saw that it was good, and blessed them, saying,
    Be fruitful, multiply, and in the seas
    And lakes and running streams the waters fill;
    And let the fowl be multiplied on the earth.''
    John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. Paradise Lost (l. Bk. VII, l. 387-398). FM. The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.
  • ''Daughter to that good Earl, once President
    Of England's Council and her Treasury,
    Who lived in both, unstain'd with gold or fee,
    And left them both, more in himself content.

    Till the sad breaking of that Parliament
    Broke him, as that dishonest victory
    At Chaeronea, fatal to liberty,
    Kill'd with report that old man eloquent;—''
    John Milton (1608-1674), British poet. To the Lady Margaret Ley (l. 1-8). . . The Complete Poetry of John Milton. John T. Shawcross, ed. (1963, rev. ed. 1971) Doubleday.

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To the Lady Margaret Ley

Daughter to that good Earl, one President
Of England’s Council and her Treasury,
Who lived in both unstained with gold or fee,
And left them both, more in himself content,
Till the sad breaking of that Parliament
Broke him, as that dishonest victory
At Chæronea, fatal to liberty,
Killed with report that old man eloquent,
Though later born than to have known the days

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