Treasure Island

John Greenleaf Whittier

(17 December 1807 – 7 September 1892 / Haverhill, Massachusetts)

Quotations

  • ''How dwarfed against his manliness
    She sees the poor pretension,
    The wants, the aims, the follies, born
    Of fashion and convention!''
    John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. "Among the Hills."
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  • ''Give fools their gold, and knaves their power;
    Let fortune's bubbles rise and fall;
    Who sows a field, or trains a flower,
    Or plants a tree, is more than all.''
    John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. A Song of Harvest.
  • ''Through this broad street, restless ever,
    Ebbs and flows a human tide,
    Wave on wave a living river;
    Wealth and fashion side by side;
    Toiler, idler, slave and master, in the same quick current glide.''
    John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. At Washington, st. 2.
  • ''She leaned far out on the window-sill,
    And shook it forth with a royal will.

    "Shoot, if you must, this old gray head,
    But spare your country's flag," she said.

    A shade of sadness, a blush of shame,
    Over the face of the leader came;''
    John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. Barbara Frietchie (l. 33-38). . . Oxford Book of American Light Verse, The. William Harmon, ed. (1979) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Up rose old Barbara Frietchie then,
    Bowed with her fourscore years and ten;

    Bravest of all in Frederick town,
    She took up the flag the men hauled down;''
    John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. Barbara Frietchie (l. 17-20). . . Oxford Book of American Light Verse, The. William Harmon, ed. (1979) Oxford University Press.
  • ''"Who touches a hair of yon gray head
    Dies like a dog! March on!" he said''
    John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. Barbara Frietchie (l. 41-42). . . Oxford Book of American Light Verse, The. William Harmon, ed. (1979) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Up from the meadows rich with corn,
    Clear in the cool September morn,''
    John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. Barbara Frietchie (l. 1-2). . . Oxford Book of American Light Verse, The. William Harmon, ed. (1979) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Honor to her! and let a tear
    Fall, for her sake, on Stonewall's bier.

    Over Barbara Frietchie's grave,
    Flag of Freedom and Union, wave!''
    John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. Barbara Frietchie (l. 53-56). . . Oxford Book of American Light Verse, The. William Harmon, ed. (1979) Oxford University Press.
  • ''All else is gone; from those great eyes
    The soul has fled:
    When faith is lost, when honor dies,
    The man is dead!

    Then, pay the reverence of old days
    To his dead fame;
    Walk backward, with averted gaze,
    And hide the shame!''
    John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. Ichabod (l. 29-36). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.
  • ''So fallen! so lost! the light withdrawn
    Which once he wore!
    The glory from his gray hairs gone
    Forevermore!''
    John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), U.S. poet. Ichabod (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Book of American Verse, The. F. O. Matthiessen, ed. (1950) Oxford University Press.

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Randolph Of Roanoke

O Mother Earth! upon thy lap
Thy weary ones receiving,
And o'er them, silent as a dream,
Thy grassy mantle weaving,
Fold softly in thy long embrace
That heart so worn and broken,
And cool its pulse of fire beneath
Thy shadows old and oaken.

[Hata Bildir]