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(25 February 1859 – 3 February 1892 / England)

Quotations

  • ''Birthdays? yes, in a general way;
    For the most if not for the best of men:
    You were born (I suppose) on a certain day:
    So was I: or perhaps in the night: what then?''
    James Kenneth Stephen (1859-1892), British poet. Sincere Flattery of R. B. (l. 1-4). . . New Oxford Book of English Light Verse, The. Kingsley Amis, ed. (1978) Oxford University Press.
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  • ''Will there never come a season
    Which shall rid us from the curse
    Of a prose which knows no reason
    And an unmelodious verse:''
    James Kenneth Stephen (1859-1892), British poet. To R. K. (l. 1-4). . . New Oxford Book of English Light Verse, The. Kingsley Amis, ed. (1978) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Two voices are there: one is of the deep;
    It learns the storm-cloud's thunderous melody,''
    James Kenneth Stephen (1859-1892), British poet. Two voices are there: one is of the deep (l. 1-2). . . New Oxford Book of English Light Verse, The. Kingsley Amis, ed. (1978) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Quite unacquainted with the ABC
    Than write such hopeless rubbish as thy worst.''
    James Kenneth Stephen (1859-1892), British poet. Two voices are there: one is of the deep (l. 13-14). . . New Oxford Book of English Light Verse, The. Kingsley Amis, ed. (1978) Oxford University Press.
  • ''And one is of an old half-witted sheep
    Which bleats articulate monotony,''
    James Kenneth Stephen (1859-1892), British poet. Two voices are there: one is of the deep (l. 5-6). . . New Oxford Book of English Light Verse, The. Kingsley Amis, ed. (1978) Oxford University Press.
  • ''And, Wordsworth, both are thine: at certain times
    Forth from the heart of thy melodious rhymes.''
    James Kenneth Stephen (1859-1892), British poet. Two voices are there: one is of the deep (l. 9-10). . . New Oxford Book of English Light Verse, The. Kingsley Amis, ed. (1978) Oxford University Press.

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A Sonnet

Two voices are there: one is of the deep;
It learns the storm-cloud's thunderous melody,
Now roars, now murmurs with the changing sea,
Now bird-like pipes, now closes soft in sleep:
And one is of an old half-witted sheep
Which bleats articulate monotony,
And indicates that two and one are three,
That grass is green, lakes damp, and mountains steep:
And, Wordsworth, both are thine: at certain times

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