Herman Melville

(1 August 1819 – 28 September 1891 / New York City, New York)

Herman Melville Poems

1. "The Ribs And Terrors In The Whale" 11/30/2015
2. Song of the Paddlers [excerpt] 7/1/2016
3. Look-Out Mountain 4/30/2012
4. Bridegroom Dick 4/17/2010
5. Falstaff's Lament Over Prince Hal Become Henry V 4/30/2012
6. The Enviable Isles 4/19/2010
7. John Marr And Other Sailors 4/17/2010
8. L'Envoi 4/17/2010
9. The Marchioness Of Brinvilliers 4/19/2010
10. Song Of Yoomy 4/19/2010
11. Lines Traced Under An Image Of Amor Threatening 4/17/2010
12. Lone Founts 4/17/2010
13. Off Cape Colonna 4/17/2010
14. The Bench Of Boors 4/19/2010
15. To Ned 4/19/2010
16. To The Master Of The _Meteor_ 4/19/2010
17. Old Counsel 4/17/2010
18. Herba Santa 4/17/2010
19. The Haglets 4/19/2010
20. Stonewall Jackson 4/19/2010
21. Jack Roy 4/17/2010
22. Invocation 4/17/2010
23. Memorials On The Slain At Chickamauga 4/17/2010
24. The Figure-Head 4/19/2010
25. The Apparition: A Retrospect 4/19/2010
26. The Good Craft _Snow Bird_ 4/19/2010
27. The Eagle Of The Blue 4/19/2010
28. The March Into Viriginia 4/19/2010
29. Inscription 4/17/2010
30. The Aeolian Harp 4/19/2010
31. The College Colonel 4/19/2010
32. The Man-O-War Hawk 4/19/2010
33. Pipe Song 4/17/2010
34. Tom Deadlight 4/19/2010
35. The March To The Sea 4/6/2011
36. The Fortitude Of The North 4/19/2010
37. Stonewall Jackson (Ascribed To A Virginian) 4/19/2010
38. Marlena 4/17/2010
39. The Age Of The Antonines 4/19/2010
40. Gold 4/17/2010
Best Poem of Herman Melville

Misgivings

When ocean-clouds over inland hills
Sweep storming in late autumn brown,
And horror the sodden valley fills,
And the spire falls crashing in the town,
I muse upon my country's ills--
The tempest burning from the waste of Time
On the world's fairest hope linked with man's foulest crime.

Nature's dark side is heeded now--
(Ah! optimist-cheer dishartened flown)--
A child may read the moody brow
Of yon black mountain lone.
With shouts the torrents down the gorges go,
And storms are formed behind the storms we feel:
The hemlock shakes in the ...

Read the full of Misgivings

The Mound By The Lake

The grass shall never forget this grave.
When homeward footing it in the sun
After the weary ride by rail,
The stripling soldiers passed her door,
Wounded perchance, or wan and pale,
She left her household work undone -
Duly the wayside table spread,
With evergreens shaded, to regale
Each travel-spent and grateful one.

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