Henry Alford

(1810-1871 / England)

Henry Alford Poems

1. I Sought For Novelty--In Vain 4/19/2010
2. Father, Wake--The Storm Is Loud 4/19/2010
3. Evermore The Night Wave Beateth On 4/19/2010
4. I Had The Sweetest Dream But Yesternight 4/19/2010
5. 1830 4/19/2010
6. 1846 4/19/2010
7. A Crimean Thought. 4/19/2010
8. A Day Dream 4/19/2010
9. A Doubt. 4/19/2010
10. A Dream 4/19/2010
11. A Greeting To Spring 4/19/2010
12. A Letter To America 4/19/2010
13. A Night Scene 4/19/2010
14. A Remembrance 4/19/2010
15. A Spring Scene. 4/19/2010
16. A Truant Hour. 4/19/2010
17. A Villiage Tale. Related Almost In The Words Of The Narrator. 4/19/2010
18. A Winter Morning Scene. 4/19/2010
19. A Wish. 4/19/2010
20. Amor Coelestis 4/19/2010
21. Amor Mundanus. 4/19/2010
22. Ampton, Suffolk 4/19/2010
23. An Answer To A Question. 4/19/2010
24. Anticipation. 4/19/2010
25. April, 1844. 4/19/2010
26. August 19, 1830 4/19/2010
27. August 22, 1830 4/19/2010
28. Ballad. 4/19/2010
29. Ballad. 4/19/2010
30. Be Just And Fear Not 4/19/2010
31. De Profundis. 4/19/2010
32. Epicedia 4/19/2010
33. Epimenides 4/19/2010
34. Evening Hexameters 4/19/2010
35. Faith. 4/19/2010
36. February 10, 1840 4/19/2010
37. February 3, 1830 4/19/2010
38. Filio Desideratissimo 4/19/2010
39. On The Evening Of A Villiage Festival. 4/19/2010
40. On The Sign Of The Cross In Baptism 4/19/2010
Best Poem of Henry Alford

You And I

My hand is lonely for your clasping, dear;
My ear is tired waiting for your call.
I want your strength to help, your laugh to cheer;
Heart, soul and senses need you, one and all.
I droop without your full, frank sympathy;
We ought to be together - you and I;
We want each other so, to comprehend
The dream, the hope, things planned, or seen, or wrought.
Companion, comforter and guide and friend,
As much as love asks love, does thought ask thought.
Life is so short, so fast the lone hours fly,
We ought to be together, you and I.

Read the full of You And I

A Crimean Thought.

Again those heavy tidings. On the breeze
Laden with death, they come. A thousand more
Stiff on the sod of Tauris: yon fair fleet,
Bearer of hope and comfort, charged with strength
For the great conflict, scattered on the rocks
Of that inhospitable sea. And those
Who lit our homes with joy, whose manly forms
Big with their manlier souls, we saw depart,
Whose names were borne with all our prayers to heaven,

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