Giles Fletcher The Younger

(1588 - 1623 / Alderton, Suffolk)

Biography of Giles Fletcher The Younger

Giles Fletcher (also known as Giles Fletcher, The Younger) was an English poet chiefly known for his long allegorical poem Christ's Victory and Triumph (1610).

He was the younger son of Giles Fletcher the Senior (minister to Elizabeth I), and the brother of the poet Phineas Fletcher, and cousin of the dramatist John Fletcher. Educated at Westminster School and Trinity College, Cambridge, he remained in Cambridge after his ordination, becoming Reader in Greek Grammar in 1615 and Reader in Greek Language in 1618. In 1619 left to become rector of Alderton in Suffolk.

His principal work has the full title Christ's Victorie and Triumph, in Heaven, in Earth, over and after Death, and consists of four cantos. The first canto, Christ's Victory in Heaven, represents a dispute in heaven between justice and mercy, using the facts of Christ's life on earth; the second, Christ's Victory on Earth, deals with an allegorical account of Christ's Temptation; the third, Christ's Triumph over Death, covers the Passion; and the fourth, Christ's Triumph after Death, covering the Resurrection and Ascension, ends with an affectionate eulogy of his brother Phineas as Thyrsilis. The meter is an eight-line stanza in the style of Edmund Spenser; the first five lines rhyme ababb, and the stanza concludes with a rhyming triplet. John Milton borrowed liberally from Christ's Victory and Triumph in Paradise Regained.

Giles Fletcher The Younger's Works:

Christ's Victorie and Triumph, in Heaven, in Earth, over and after Death (1610)

This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia Giles Fletcher The Younger; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA.

PoemHunter.com Updates

The Heavenly Jerusalem

Here may the band, that now in triumph shines,
And that (before they were invested thus)
In earthly bodies carried heavenly minds,
Pitched round about in order glorious,
Their sunny tents, and houses luminous,
All their eternal day in songs employing,
Joying their end, without end of their joying,
While their almighty prince destruction is destroying.

[Hata Bildir]