Francesco Petrarch


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Francesco Petrarcha was born in Arezzo of a family exiled from Florence in 1301. His father was a notary. He studied at Montpellier University and at law school, and became chaplain to Cardinal Colonna. He travelled in France, Flanders and Germany. He met his idealized woman, Laura, in 1327. She died of the Black Death in 1348. His series of love sonnets and other poems strongly influenced ... more »

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  • Gold Star - 69,158 Points Fabrizio Frosini (10/13/2015 8:45:00 AM)

    and the original text of Petrarch's sonnet CCCX:

    Zephiro torna, e ’l bel tempo rimena,
    e i fiori et l’erbe, sua dolce famiglia,
    et garrir Progne et pianger Philomena,
    et primavera candida et vermiglia.

    Ridono i prati, e ’l ciel si rasserena;
    Giove s’allegra di mirar sua figlia;
    l’aria et l’acqua et la terra è d’amor piena;
    ogni animal d’amar si riconsiglia.

    Ma per me, lasso, tornano i piú gravi
    sospiri, che del cor profondo tragge
    quella ch’al ciel se ne portò le chiavi;

    et cantar augelletti, et fiorir piagge,
    e ’n belle donne honeste atti soavi
    sono un deserto, et fere aspre et selvagge.

  • Gold Star - 69,158 Points Fabrizio Frosini (10/13/2015 8:44:00 AM)

    here is one of Petrarch's sonnet - CCCX:

    Zephyrus returns, and brings clear weather,
    and flowers and grasses, the whole sweet family,
    and Procne’s quarrelsome call, and Philomel’s weeping,
    and spring’s white and vermilion.
    The meadows exult and the skies turn serene,
    Jove’s happy to see daughter Venus,
    air and water and earth, all full of love,
    every animal reconciles itself again to loving.
    For me, though, alas! the weightiest sighs
    return, drawing up out of my heart’s deeps
    the one who’d owned the keys to heaven.
    And singing of little birds and flowering fields,
    the pretty girls act perfectly disgraceful
    like in a desert, like bitter and savage beasts.

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Best Poem of Francesco Petrarch



Diana was never more pleasing to her lover,
when, by a stroke of fate, he saw her naked,
shown in the deep pool of icy water,
than I was by the mountain shepherdess,
standing there to wash her delightful veil,
that keeps blonde, lovely hair from the wind’s stress,
so that, now heaven’s fires overspill,
she made me tremble with an amorous chill.


Now that the wind and earth and sky are silent,
and the wild birds and creatures curbed by sleep,
without a wave the sea rests in the deep,
Night’s chariot moving to its ...

Read the full of Petrarch Updates

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