Poetics and Poetry Discussion


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  • Rookie Michael Shepherd (4/17/2005 7:40:00 AM) Post reply | Read 1 reply
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    Allan dear child, have you read the green bit above this message? Perhaps your playground is elsewhere? Surely you've read Gertrude Stein: 'Those who care are those who care are those who care for care is care and those who care care for care and those who care for care care.' Doesn't that put it so neatly?

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    • Rookie Katherine Gough (4/17/2005 7:55:00 AM) Post reply

      Thankyou so much for your input, any other interpretations you might have would be greatly appreciated! ! !

  • Rookie Allan James Saywell (4/17/2005 7:29:00 AM) Post reply

    WHO REALLY BLOODY CARES ABOUT THIS STUFF YOU DIG UP OUT OF YOUR OLD AUNTS CUPBOARD PRETEND YOU HAVE A GREAT KNOWLEDGE ABOUT IT TRY TO MAKE OUT YOU ACTUALLY KNOW WHAT YOUR TALKING ABOUT, IT IS BLOODY BORING, PUT YOUR OLD POETRY
    ON THE SITE SO PEOPLE HAVE THE RIGHT TO IGNORE IT, NOT IN THE FORUM YOU
    BLOODY GREAT BORE ANDREW OR MARK OR WAS IT MARY OR WHOEVER YOU ARE

  • Rookie Michael Shepherd (4/17/2005 7:02:00 AM) Post reply

    I would take it that Hesse - the author of the much-loved in the 1960s, 'Siddhartha', is affirming that the poet has sharp observation allied to insight, imagination and vision.
    The last line is the problem. The translation may be the problem also. Anyone here a poet who speaks German (don't all shout at once...) ? Does it follow John Ciardi's distinction - that the poet is garlanded, but people don't remember the man himself? (Well, how about Hesse as the criterion of that? Have you ardent readers of Siddhartha the faintest idea of his dates even?)

  • Rookie Katherine Gough (4/17/2005 6:18:00 AM) Post reply | Read 1 reply

    I have just read a poem by Hermann Hesse. It is called 'The Poet'
    I'd appreciate it if someone could read it, and possibly give me their ideas as to what they think the whole poem means! ! !

    Thankyou: D

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    • Rookie Andy Konisberg (4/17/2005 6:40:00 AM) Post reply

      perhaps it has to do with the depreciation of art. and instead of Nietszche's 'God is dead' story, Hesse is saying 'the poet is dead'. the poet walks with beauty, but beauty is often lost in the hum-a ... more

  • Rookie Allan James Saywell (4/17/2005 5:51:00 AM) Post reply

    neither do i read herbert Nehrlich you will enjoy, it is his real name
    unlike most of the poets

  • Rookie Michael Shepherd (4/17/2005 5:23:00 AM) Post reply

    Serafina, although you say you trust no-one, the list of 500 on the home page extension tells you the poets who are actually read today. Though I must warn you that certain living poets have a way of boosting their position on that table. As you will soon realise when you read their poetry.
    The list of the currently favourite 500 poems, however, is a rather better guide, at least as far as the first 250 - being less subject to tampering.
    Enjoy!

  • Rookie Neil Francis Brooks (4/17/2005 2:03:00 AM) Post reply | Read 1 reply

    I was wondering has anyone read or even heard any words of JOHN COOPER CLARKE.

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    • Rookie Michael Shepherd (4/17/2005 5:15:00 AM) Post reply

      Neil, the name was familiar in earlier years as having a certain reputation but beyond that I, maddeningly, can't remember anything more. Google? Phone/email Poetry Society's librarian?

  • Rookie Allan James Saywell (4/17/2005 12:29:00 AM) Post reply | Read 1 reply

    do the english love the frogs we we, i dont think so remember, ' napoleon'

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  • Rookie Allan James Saywell (4/16/2005 4:58:00 PM) Post reply | Read 1 reply

    not many poets in the corridor this morning, you dont have to worry i just gave england a trankquilliser, he will be sound asleep in a couple of minutes
    where do you find these people, what sort of places do you hang out in
    i'm glad i'm not educated, oh dear what do we do with him, it must be embarrising
    sorry about the spelling, i'm a little sleepy this morning, oh well must have some roast snake it is sunday in Australia the lucky country

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  • Rookie Michael Shepherd (4/16/2005 4:57:00 PM) Post reply

    Mark, the wallpaper in question is quoted as having said 'eh bien mes chers, il y a toujours a tous les vies un plus grand dessin ' ('there's a greater pattern to every life...')

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