Edmund Waller

(3 March 1606 – 21 October 1687 / Coleshill / Buckinghamshire / England)

Quotations

  • ''Then die that she
    The common fate of all things rare
    May read in thee;''
    Edmund Waller (1606-1687), British poet. Go, Lovely Rose (l. 16-18). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
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  • ''Go, lovely Rose—
    Tell her that wastes her time and me
    That now she knows,
    When I resemble her to thee,
    How sweet and fair she seems to be.''
    Edmund Waller (1606-1687), British poet. Go, Lovely Rose (l. 1-5). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
  • ''The fear of hell, or aiming to be blest,
    Savours too much of private interest.''
    Edmund Waller (1606-1687), British poet. Of Divine Love, cto. 2.
  • ''Poets that lasting Marble seek
    Must carve in Latine or in Greek,
    We write in Sand, our Language grows,
    And like the Tide our work o'erflows.''
    Edmund Waller (1606-1687), British poet. Of English Verse (l. 13-16). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''The soul's dark cottage, battered and decayed,
    Lets in new light through chinks that Time has made:
    Stronger by weakness, wiser men become
    As they draw near to their eternal home.
    Leaving the old, both worlds at once they view
    That stand upon the threshold of the new.''
    Edmund Waller (1606-1687), British poet. Of The Last Verses in the Book (l. 7-12). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
  • ''A narrow compass! and yet there
    Dwelt all that's good, and all that's fair!''
    Edmund Waller (1606-1687), British poet. On a Girdle (l. 9-10). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
  • ''It was my heaven's extremest sphere,
    The pale which held that lovely deer;
    My joy, my grief, my hope, my love,
    Did all within this circle move!''
    Edmund Waller (1606-1687), British poet. On a Girdle (l. 5-8). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
  • ''The yielding marble of her snowy breast.''
    Edmund Waller (1606-1687), British poet. On a Lady Passing through a Crowd of People.
  • ''Take heed, fair Eve! you do not make
    Another tempter of this snake;
    A marble one so warmed would speak.''
    Edmund Waller (1606-1687), British poet. To a Fair Lady Playing with a Snake (l. 16-18). . . Poetry in English; an Anthology. M. L. Rosenthal, general ed. (1987) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Yet fairest blossome do not slight
    That age which you may know so soon:
    The rosie Morn resignes her light,
    And milder glory to the Noon:
    And then what wonder shall you do,
    Whose dawning beauty warms us so?''
    Edmund Waller (1606-1687), British poet. To a Very Young Lady (l. 7-12). . . Oxford Book of Seventeenth Century Verse, The. H. J. C. Grierson and G. Bullough, eds. (1934) Oxford University Press.

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The Self Banished

It is not that I love you less
Than when before your feet I lay,
But to prevent the sad increase
Of hopeless love, I keep away.

In vain (alas!) for everything
Which I have known belong to you,
Your form does to my fancy bring,
And makes my old wounds bleed anew.

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