Edmund Spenser

(1552 - 13 January 1599 / London / England)

Quotations

  • ''Like as the culver on the bared bough
    Sits mourning for the absence of her mate,''
    Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Amoretti; LXXXIX. Like as the culver (l. 1-2). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
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  • ''Dark is my day whiles her fair light I miss,
    And dead my life, that wants such lively bliss.''
    Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Amoretti; LXXXIX. Like as the culver (l. 13-14). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
  • ''Dark is the world, where your light shined never;
    Well is he born, that may behold you ever.''
    Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Amoretti; V. More than most fair (l. 13-14). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
  • ''But angels come to lead frail minds to rest
    In chaste desires, on heavenly beauty bound.
    You frame my thoughts, and fashion me within;
    You stop my tongue, and teach my heart to speak;''
    Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Amoretti; VIII. More than most fair (l. 7-10). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
  • ''More than most fair, full of the living fire,
    Kindled above unto the Maker near;''
    Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Amoretti; VIII. More than most fair (l. 1-2). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
  • ''But that which fairest is but few behold:
    Her mind, adorned with virtues manifold.''
    Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Amoretti; XV. Ye tradeful merchants (l. 13-14). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
  • ''Ye tradeful Merchants, that, with weary toil,
    Do seek most precious things to make your gain,
    And both the Indias of their treasure spoil,''
    Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Amoretti; XV. Ye tradeful merchants (l. 1-3). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
  • ''My Love is like to ice, and I to fire:
    How comes it then that this her cold so great
    Is not dissolved through my so hot desire,
    But harder grows the more I her entreat?''
    Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Amoretti; XXX. My love is like to ice (l. 1-4). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
  • ''Such is the power of love in gentle mind,
    That it can alter all the course of kind.''
    Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Amoretti; XXX. My love is like to ice (l. 13-14). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
  • ''What guyle is this, that those her golden tresses,
    She doth attyre under a net of gold:''
    Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Amoretti; XXXVII. What guyle is this (l. 1-2). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.

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Sonnet XLV

LEaue lady, in your glasse of christall clene,
Your goodly selfe for euermore to vew:
and in my selfe, my inward selfe I meane,
most liuely lyke behold your semblant trew.
Within my hart, though hardly it can shew,
thing so diuine to vew of earthly eye:
the fayre Idea of your celestiall hew,
and euery part remaines immortally:
And were it not that through your cruelty,

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