Treasure Island

Edmund Spenser

(1552 - 13 January 1599 / London / England)

Quotations

  • ''Like as the culver on the bared bough
    Sits mourning for the absence of her mate,''
    Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Amoretti; LXXXIX. Like as the culver (l. 1-2). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
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  • ''Dark is my day whiles her fair light I miss,
    And dead my life, that wants such lively bliss.''
    Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Amoretti; LXXXIX. Like as the culver (l. 13-14). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
  • ''Dark is the world, where your light shined never;
    Well is he born, that may behold you ever.''
    Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Amoretti; V. More than most fair (l. 13-14). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
  • ''But angels come to lead frail minds to rest
    In chaste desires, on heavenly beauty bound.
    You frame my thoughts, and fashion me within;
    You stop my tongue, and teach my heart to speak;''
    Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Amoretti; VIII. More than most fair (l. 7-10). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
  • ''More than most fair, full of the living fire,
    Kindled above unto the Maker near;''
    Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Amoretti; VIII. More than most fair (l. 1-2). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
  • ''But that which fairest is but few behold:
    Her mind, adorned with virtues manifold.''
    Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Amoretti; XV. Ye tradeful merchants (l. 13-14). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
  • ''Ye tradeful Merchants, that, with weary toil,
    Do seek most precious things to make your gain,
    And both the Indias of their treasure spoil,''
    Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Amoretti; XV. Ye tradeful merchants (l. 1-3). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
  • ''My Love is like to ice, and I to fire:
    How comes it then that this her cold so great
    Is not dissolved through my so hot desire,
    But harder grows the more I her entreat?''
    Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Amoretti; XXX. My love is like to ice (l. 1-4). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
  • ''Such is the power of love in gentle mind,
    That it can alter all the course of kind.''
    Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Amoretti; XXX. My love is like to ice (l. 13-14). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.
  • ''What guyle is this, that those her golden tresses,
    She doth attyre under a net of gold:''
    Edmund Spenser (1552?-1599), British poet. Amoretti; XXXVII. What guyle is this (l. 1-2). . . The Complete Poetical Works of Spenser. R. E. Neil Dodge, ed. (1936) Houghton Mifflin.

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Iambicum Trimetrum

Unhappy verse, the witness of my unhappy state,
Make thy self flutt'ring wings of thy fast flying
Thought, and fly forth unto my love, wheresoever she be:
Whether lying restless in heavy bed, or else
Sitting so cheerless at the cheerful board, or else
Playing alone careless on her heavenly virginals.
If in bed, tell her, that my eyes can take no rest:
If at board, tell her, that my mouth can eat no meat:
If at her virginals, tell her, I can hear no mirth.

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