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Dante Alighieri

(1265 - 1321 / Florence / Italy)

Quotations

  • ''This miserable state is borne by the wretched souls of those who lived without disgrace and without praise.''
    Dante Alighieri (1265-1321), Italian poet. "Inferno," cto. 3, l. 34, The Divine Comedy (1321). referring to the souls of the Futile (See Dante on disgrace.).
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  • ''Let us not speak of them; but look, and pass on.''
    Dante Alighieri (1265-1321), Italian poet. "Inferno," cto. 3, l. 51, The Divine Comedy (1321). Said by Virgil, of the souls of the Futile in the vestibule to Hell.
  • ''Midway along the journey of our life [Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita] I woke to find myself in a dark wood, for I had wandered off from the straight path.''
    Dante Alighieri (1265-1321), Italian poet. "Inferno," cto. 1, l. 1-3, The Divine Comedy (c. 1307-1321), trans. by Mark Musa (1971). First lines of the Divine Comedy.
  • ''There is no greater sorrow than to recall a happy time in the midst of wretchedness.''
    Dante Alighieri (1265-1321), Italian poet. "Inferno," cto. 5, l. 121-3, The Divine Comedy (1321). spoken by Francesca da Rimini. This thought appears in Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy, bk. 2 (6th century).
  • ''O conscience, upright and stainless, how bitter a sting to thee is a little fault!''
    Dante Alighieri (1265-1321), Italian poet. "Purgatory," cto. 3, The Divine Comedy (completed 1321).
  • ''Honor the greatest poet.''
    Dante Alighieri (1265-1321), Italian poet. "The Inferno," cto. 4, The Divine Comedy.

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