Members Who Read Most Number Of Poems

Live Scores

Click here to see the rest of the list

(1952 -- / Madison, Wisconsin)

Biography of Connie Wanek

Connie Wanek poet

Connie Wanek is an American poet.

Life

She was born in Madison, Wisconsin, and grew up in Las Cruces, New Mexico. In 1989 she moved with her family to Duluth, Minnesota where she now lives.

Her work appeared in Poetry, The Atlantic Monthly, The Virginia Quarterly Review, Quarterly West, Poetry East, Prairie Schooner and Missouri Review.

She has published three books of poetry, and served as co-editor of the comprehensive historical anthology of Minnesota women poets, called To Sing Along the Way (New Rivers Press, 2006). Ted Kooser, Poet Laureate of the United States (2004–2006), named her a Witter Bynner Fellow of the Library of Congress for 2006.

Awards

Willow Poetry Prize
Jane Kenyon Poetry Prize.
2006 Witter Bynner Fellowship of the Library of Congress by United States Poet Laureate Ted Kooser.
2009 George Morrison Artist of the Year

Connie Wanek's Works:

"Leftovers", Narrative, Winter 2008
"Hartley Field". Poetry. August 2001.
"Lipstick". The Atlantic Monthly. November 2004.
Hartley Field: poems. Holy Cow! Press
Bonfire: poems. New Rivers Press. 1997
On Speaking Terms. Copper Canyon Press

Anthologies

Joyce Sutphen, Thom Tammaro, Connie Wanek, ed. (2006). To Sing Along the Way: Minnesota Women Poets from Pre-Territorial Days to the Present. New Rivers Press
Billy Collins, ed. (2003). Poetry 180: a turning back to poetry. Random House Trade Paperbacks

This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia Connie Wanek; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA.

PoemHunter.com Updates

The Coin Behind Your Ear

Before you knew you owned it
it was gone, stolen, and you were a fool.
How you never felt it is the wonder,
heavy and thick,
lodged deep in your hair like a burr.
You still see the smile of the magician
as he turned the coin in his long fingers,
which had so disturbed your ear
with their caress. You watched him

[Hata Bildir]