Treasure Island

Christopher Marlowe

(26 February 1564 - 30 May 1593 / Canterbury, England)

Quotations

  • ''Was this the face that launched a thousand ships,
    And burnt the topless towers of Ilium?
    Sweet Helen, make me immortal with a kiss.—
    Her lips suck forth my soul; see where it flies!—
    Come, Helen, come, give me my soul again.
    Here will I dwell, for heaven be in these lips,
    And all is dross that is not Helena.''
    Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British poet. Doctor Faustus (l. V, i). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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  • ''See, see where Christ's blood streams in the firmament!
    One drop would save my soul—half a drop! ah, my Christ!—
    Ah, rend not my heart for naming of my Christ!—
    Yet will I call on him!—O, spare me, Lucifer!—
    Where is it now? 'T is gone; and see where God
    Stretcheth out his arm, and bends his ireful brows!—
    Mountains and hills, come, come and fall on me,
    And hide me from the heavy wrath of God!''
    Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British poet. Doctor Faustus (l. V, ii). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''Ah, Faustus,
    Now hast thou but one bare hour to live,
    And then thou must be damned perpetually!
    Stand still, you ever-moving spheres of heaven,
    That time may cease and midnight never come!
    Fair Nature's eye, rise, rise again and make
    Perpetual day; or let this hour be but
    A year, a month, a week, a natural day,
    That Faustus may repent and save his soul!''
    Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British poet. Doctor Faustus (l. V, ii). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''What are kings, when regiment is gone,
    But perfect shadows in a sunshine day?''
    Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British dramatist, poet. Edward, in Edward II, act 5, sc. 1, l. 26-7 (1593).
  • ''All places are alike,
    And every earth is fit for burial.''
    Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British dramatist, poet. Edward, in Edward II, act 5, sc. 1.
  • ''The stars move still, time runs, the clock will strike,
    The devil will come, and Faustus must be damned.
    O I'll leap up to my God: who pulls me down?
    See, see, where Christ's blood streams in the firmament.
    One drop would save my soul, half a drop, ah my Christ.''
    Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British dramatist, poet. Faustus, in The Tragical History of Dr. Faustus, act 5, sc. 1 (1604).
  • ''You stars that reigned at my nativity,
    Whose influence hath allotted death and hell.''
    Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British dramatist, poet. Faustus, in The Tragical History of Dr. Faustus, act 5, sc. 2, l. 155-6 (1604).
  • ''Was this the face that launch'd a thousand ships,
    And burnt the topless towers of Ilium?''
    Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British dramatist, poet. Faustus, in The Tragical History of Dr. Faustus, act 5, sc. 1, l. 96-7 (1604). Referring to Helen of Troy, conjured up by Faustus.
  • ''Jewels being lost are found againe, this never,
    T'is lost but once, and once lost, lost for ever.''
    Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British poet. Hero and Leander (II, l. 85-86). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.
  • ''At Sestos, Hero dwelt; Hero the faire,
    Whom young Apollo, courted for her haire,
    And offred as a dower his burning throne,
    Where she should sit for men to gaze upon.''
    Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593), British poet. Hero and Leander (I, l. 5-8). . . Norton Anthology of Poetry, The. Alexander W. Allison and others, eds. (3d ed., 1983) W. W. Norton & Company.

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Ignoto

I love thee not for sacred chastity.
Who loves for that? nor for thy sprightly wit:
I love thee not for thy sweet modesty,
Which makes thee in perfection's throne to sit.
I love thee not for thy enchanting eye,
Thy beauty, ravishing perfection:
I love thee not for that my soul doth dance,
And leap with pleasure when those lips of thine,
Give musical and graceful utterance,

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