Charles Dudley Warner


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Charles Dudley Warner (September 12, 1829 – October 20, 1900) was an American essayist, novelist, and friend of Mark Twain, with whom he co-authored the novel The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today.

Warner was born of Puritan descent in Plainfield, Massachusetts. From the ages of six to fourteen he lived in Charlemont, Massachusetts, the scene of the experiences pictured in his study of ... more »

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Quotations

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  • ''Politics makes strange bed-fellows.''
    Charles Dudley Warner (1829-1900), U.S. editor, author. "Fifteenth Week," My Summer in a Garden (1871).
  • ''Lettuce is like conversation: it must be fresh and crisp, and so sparkling that you scarcely notice the bitter in it.''
    Charles Dudley Warner (1829-1901), U.S. author. My Summer in a Garden (1870).
  • ''Mud-pies gratify one of our first and best instincts. So long as we are dirty, we are pure.''
    Charles Dudley Warner (1829-1900), U.S. author. "Preliminary," My Summer in a Garden (1817).
  • ''It is fortunate that each generation does not comprehend its own ignorance. We are thus enabled to call our ancestors barbarous.''
    Charles Dudley Warner (1829-1900), U.S. editor, author. "Second Study," Backlog Studies (1873).
  • ''What a man needs in gardening is a cast-iron back, with a hinge in it.''
    Charles Dudley Warner (1829-1900), U.S. essayist, novelist. "Third Week," My Summer in a Garden (1871).
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