Arthur Hugh Clough

(1 January 1819 – 13 November 1861 / Liverpool)

Quotations

  • ''As I sat at the cafe, I said to myself,
    They may talk as they please about what they call pelf,
    They may sneer as they like about eating and drinking,
    But help it I cannot, I cannot help thinking
    How pleasant it is to have money, heigh ho!
    How pleasant it is to have money.''
    Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861), Anglo-American poet. Dipsychus (l. 1-6). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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  • ''"There is no God," the wicked saith,
    "And truly it's a blessing,
    For what he might have done with us
    It's better only guessing."''
    Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861), Anglo-American poet. Dipsychus (l. 1-4). . . Norton Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. M. H. Abrams, general ed. (5th ed., 1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
  • ''But country folks who live beneath
    The shadow and the steeple;
    The parson and the parson's wife,
    And mostly married people;''
    Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861), Anglo-American poet. Dipsychus (l. 21-24). . . Norton Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. M. H. Abrams, general ed. (5th ed., 1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
  • ''And almost every one when age,
    Disease, or sorrows strike him,
    Inclines to think there is a God,
    Or something very like Him.''
    Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861), Anglo-American poet. Dipsychus (l. 29-32). . . Norton Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. M. H. Abrams, general ed. (5th ed., 1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
  • ''And not by eastern windows only,
    When daylight comes, comes in the light;
    In front the sun climbs slow, how slowly!
    But westward, look, the land is bright!''
    Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861), Anglo-American poet. Say Not the Struggle Nought Availeth (l. 13-16). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''If hopes were dupes, fears may be liars.''
    Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861), British poet. repr. In Collected Poems, ed. C. Whibley (1913). "Say Not the Struggle Nought Availeth," (1862).
  • ''Say not the struggle nought availeth,
    The labour and the wounds are vain,
    The enemy faints not, nor faileth,
    And as things have been they remain.''
    Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861), Anglo-American poet. Say Not the Struggle Nought Availeth (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''Thou shalt not kill; but need'st not strive
    Officiously to keep alive:
    Do not adultery commit;
    Advantage rarely comes of it:''
    Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861), Anglo-American poet. The Latest Decalogue (l. 11-14). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''Thou shalt not covet; but tradition
    Approves all forms of competition.''
    Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861), British poet. repr. In Collected Poems, ed. C. Whibley (1913). "The Latest Decalogue," l. 19-20 (1862).
  • ''Thou shalt not kill; but need'st not strive
    Officiously to keep alive.''
    Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861), British poet. repr. In Collected Poems, ed. C. Whibley (1913). "The Latest Decalogue," (1862).

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In a London Square

Put forth thy leaf, thou lofty plane,
East wind and frost are safely gone;
With zephyr mild and balmy rain
The summer comes serenly on;
Earth, air, and sun and skies combine
To promise all that's kind and fair: -
But thou, O human heart of mine,
Be still, contain thyself, and bear.

[Hata Bildir]