Members Who Read Most Number Of Poems

(1 January 1819 – 13 November 1861 / Liverpool)

Quotations

  • ''As I sat at the cafe, I said to myself,
    They may talk as they please about what they call pelf,
    They may sneer as they like about eating and drinking,
    But help it I cannot, I cannot help thinking
    How pleasant it is to have money, heigh ho!
    How pleasant it is to have money.''
    Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861), Anglo-American poet. Dipsychus (l. 1-6). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
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  • ''"There is no God," the wicked saith,
    "And truly it's a blessing,
    For what he might have done with us
    It's better only guessing."''
    Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861), Anglo-American poet. Dipsychus (l. 1-4). . . Norton Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. M. H. Abrams, general ed. (5th ed., 1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
  • ''But country folks who live beneath
    The shadow and the steeple;
    The parson and the parson's wife,
    And mostly married people;''
    Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861), Anglo-American poet. Dipsychus (l. 21-24). . . Norton Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. M. H. Abrams, general ed. (5th ed., 1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
  • ''And almost every one when age,
    Disease, or sorrows strike him,
    Inclines to think there is a God,
    Or something very like Him.''
    Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861), Anglo-American poet. Dipsychus (l. 29-32). . . Norton Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. M. H. Abrams, general ed. (5th ed., 1986) W. W. Norton & Company.
  • ''And not by eastern windows only,
    When daylight comes, comes in the light;
    In front the sun climbs slow, how slowly!
    But westward, look, the land is bright!''
    Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861), Anglo-American poet. Say Not the Struggle Nought Availeth (l. 13-16). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''If hopes were dupes, fears may be liars.''
    Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861), British poet. repr. In Collected Poems, ed. C. Whibley (1913). "Say Not the Struggle Nought Availeth," (1862).
  • ''Say not the struggle nought availeth,
    The labour and the wounds are vain,
    The enemy faints not, nor faileth,
    And as things have been they remain.''
    Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861), Anglo-American poet. Say Not the Struggle Nought Availeth (l. 1-4). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''Thou shalt not kill; but need'st not strive
    Officiously to keep alive:
    Do not adultery commit;
    Advantage rarely comes of it:''
    Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861), Anglo-American poet. The Latest Decalogue (l. 11-14). . . Oxford Anthology of English Literature, The, Vols. I-II. Frank Kermode and John Hollander, general eds. (1973) Oxford University Press (Also published as six paperback vols.: Medieval English Literature, J. B. Trapp, ed.; The Literature of Renaissance England, John Hollander and Frank Kermode, eds.; The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, Martin Price, ed.; Romantic Poetry and Prose, Harold Bloom and Lionel Trilling, eds.; Victorian Prose and Poetry, Lionel Trilling and Harold Bloom, eds.; Modern British Literature, Frank Kermode and John Hollander, eds.).
  • ''Thou shalt not covet; but tradition
    Approves all forms of competition.''
    Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861), British poet. repr. In Collected Poems, ed. C. Whibley (1913). "The Latest Decalogue," l. 19-20 (1862).
  • ''Thou shalt not kill; but need'st not strive
    Officiously to keep alive.''
    Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861), British poet. repr. In Collected Poems, ed. C. Whibley (1913). "The Latest Decalogue," (1862).

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How In All Wonder...

How in all wonder Columbus got over,
That is a marvel to me, I protest,
Cabot, and Raleigh too, that well-read rover,
Frobisher, Dampier, Drake and the rest.
Bad enough all the same,
For them that after came,
But, in great Heaven's name,
How he should ever think
That on the other brink

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