Angelina Grimké


Quotations

  • ''I have not placed reading before praying because I regard it more important, but because, in order to pray aright, we must understand what we are praying for.''
    Angelina Grimké (1805-1879), U.S. abolitionist, feminist. repr. In The Oven Birds: American Women on Womanhood 1820-1920, ed. Gail Parker (1972). "Appeal to the Christian Women of the South," Anti-Slavery Examiner (September 1836).
    0 person liked.
    2 person did not like.
  • ''We are commanded to love God with all our minds, as well as with all our hearts, and we commit a great sin if we forbid or prevent that cultivation of the mind in others which would enable them to perform this duty.''
    Angelina Grimké (1805-1879), U.S. abolitionist, feminist. repr. In The Oven Birds: American Women on Womanhood 1820- 1920, ed. Gail Parker (1972). "Appeal to the Christian Women of the South," Anti-Slavery Examiner (September 1836).
  • ''The doctrine of blind obedience and unqualified submission to any human power, whether civil or ecclesiastical, is the doctrine of despotism, and ought to have no place 'mong Republicans and Christians.''
    Angelina Grimké (1805-1879), U.S. abolitionist, feminist. Anti-Slavery Examiner (Sept. 1836). "Appeal to the Christian Women of the South," The Oven Birds: American Women on Womanhood 1820-1920, ed. Gail Parker (1972).
  • ''The doctrine of blind obedience and unqualified submission to any human power, whether civil or ecclesiastical, is the doctrine of despotism, and ought to have no place 'mong Republicans and Christians.''
    Angelina Grimké (1805-1879), U.S. abolitionist, feminist. Anti-Slavery Examiner (Sept. 1836). "Appeal to the Christian Women of the South," The Oven Birds: American Women on Womanhood 1820-1920, ed. Gail Parker (1972).
  • ''The doctrine of blind obedience and unqualified submission to any human power, whether civil or ecclesiastical, is the doctrine of despotism, and ought to have no place 'mong Republicans and Christians.''
    Angelina Grimké (1805-1879), U.S. abolitionist, feminist. repr. In The Oven Birds: American Women on Womanhood 1820- 1920, ed. Gail Parker (1972). "Appeal to the Christian Women of the South," Anti-Slavery Examiner (Sept. 1836).
  • ''... no one who has not been an integral part of a slaveholding community, can have any idea of its abominations.... even were slavery no curse to its victims, the exercise of arbitrary power works such fearful ruin upon the hearts of slaveholders, that I should feel impelled to labor and pray for its overthrow with my last energies and latest breath.''
    Angelina Grimké (1805-1879), U.S. abolitionist. As quoted in American Slavery As It Is, by Theodore D. Weld (1839). Said on April 6, 1839. The daughters of a South Carolina slaveholding family, Angelina and her sister Sarah had moved north to escape the presence of the slave system and become active abolitionists.
  • ''One who is a slaveholder at heart never recognizes a human being in a slave.''
    Angelina Grimké (1805-1879), U.S. abolitionist. As quoted in American Slavery As It Is, by Theodore D. Weld (1839). Said on April 6, 1839. The daughters of a South Carolina slaveholding family, Angelina and her sister Sarah had moved north to escape the presence of the slave system and become active abolitionists.
  • ''I appeal to you, my friends, as mothers: are you willing to enslave your children? You start back with horror and indignation at such a questions. But why, if slavery is not wrong to those upon whom it is imposed?''
    Angelina Grimké (1805-1879), U.S. abolitionist and feminist. As quoted in The Grimke Sisters from South Carolina, ch. 9, by Gerda Lerner (1967). Said in 1836.
  • ''Women ought to feel a peculiar sympathy in the colored man's wrong, for, like him, she has been accused of mental inferiority, and denied the privileges of a liberal education.''
    Angelina Grimké (1805-1879), U.S. abolitionist and feminist. As quoted in The Grimke Sisters from South Carolina, ch. 10, by Gerda Lerner (1967). From a paper prepared for a May 1837 antislavery convention of women. Grimke, the daughter of a South Carolina slaveowner, had severed relations with her family and moved North.
  • ''My country is bleeding, my people are perishing around me. But I feel as a South Carolinian, I am bound to tell the North, go on! go on! Never falter, never abandon the principles which you have adopted.''
    Angelina Grimké (1805-1879), U.S. abolitionist and feminist. As quoted in The Grimke Sisters from South Carolina, ch. 19, by Gerda Lerner (1967). Speaking on May 14, 1863, at a national convention of women called to consider how Northern women might best aid the Union war effort. Raised in South Carolina, Grimke had moved North in 1829 to escape constant contact with slavery, which she abhorred.

Read more quotations »
[Hata Bildir]