Andrew Marvell

(31 March 1621 – 16 August 1678 / Yorkshire, England)

Quotations

  • ''But 'twas beyond a mortal's share
    To wander solitary there:
    Two Paradises 'twere in one,
    To live in Paradise alone.''
    Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British metaphysical poet. The Garden, st. 8 (written c. 1650, published 1681).
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  • ''Luxurious Man, to bring his Vice in use,
    Did after him the World seduce:
    And from the fields the Flow'rs and Plants allure,''
    Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. The Mower against Gardens (l. 1-3). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
  • ''And yet these Rarities might be allow'd,
    To Man, that sov'raign thing and proud;
    Had he not dealt between the Bark and Tree,
    Forbidden mixtures there to see.
    No Plant now knew the Stock from which it came;
    He grafts upon the Wild the Tame:''
    Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. The Mower against Gardens (l. 19-24). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
  • ''My mind was once the true survey
    Of all these meadows fresh and gay,
    And in the greenness of the grass
    Did see its hopes as in a glass;
    When Juliana came, and she,
    What I do to the grass, does to my thoughts and me.''
    Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. The Mower's Song (l. 1-6). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
  • ''Your courteous lights in vain you waste,
    Since Juliana here is come,
    For she my mind hath so displaced
    That I shall never find my home.''
    Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. The Mower to the Glow-Worms (l. 13-16). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
  • ''For I so truly thee bemoane,
    That I shall weep though I be Stone:
    Until my Tears, still drooping, wear
    My breast, themselves engraving there.
    There at me feet shalt thou be laid,
    Of purest Alabaster made:
    For I would have thine Image be
    White as I can, though not as Thee.''
    Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. The Nymph Complaining for the Death of Her Fawn (l. 115-122). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
  • ''The wanton Troopers riding by
    Have shot my Fawn and it will die.
    Ungentle men! They cannot thrive
    To kill thee. Thou ne'er didst alive
    Them any harm: alas, nor could
    Thy death yet do them any good.''
    Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. The Nymph Complaining for the Death of Her Fawn.
  • ''But all its chief delight was still
    On Roses thus its self to fill:
    And its pure virgin Limbs to fold
    In whitest sheets of Lillies cold.
    Had it liv'd long it would have been
    Lillies without, Roses within.''
    Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. The Nymph Complaining for the Death of Her Fawn (l. 87-92). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
  • ''With sweetest milk, and sugar, first
    I it as mine own fingers nurst.
    And as it grew, so every day
    It wax'd more white and sweet than they.
    It had so sweet a Breath!''
    Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. The Nymph Complaining for the Death of Her Fawn (l. 55-59). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.
  • ''But O, young beauty of the woods,
    Whom Nature courts with fruits and flowers,
    Gather the flowers, but spare the buds;
    Lest Flora, angry at thy crime
    To kill her infants in their prime,
    Do quickly make the example yours;
    And ere we see,
    Nip in the blossom all our hopes and thee.''
    Andrew Marvell (1621-1678), British poet. The Picture of Little T. C. in a Prospect of Flowers (l. 33-40). . . The Complete Poems [Andrew Marvell]. Elizabeth Story Donno, ed. (1972, repr. 1985) Penguin.

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Cromwell's Return

An Horatian Ode upon Cromwell's Return From Ireland

The forward youth that would appear
Must now forsake his muses dear,
Nor in the shadows sing,
His numbers languishing.
'Tis time to leave the books in dust,
And oil the unusèd armour's rust:
Removing from the wall

[Hata Bildir]