Treasure Island

Alexander Pope

(21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744 / London / England)

Quotations

  • ''Some judge of authors' names, not works, and then
    Nor praise nor blame the writings, but the men.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. II). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
    100 person liked.
    54 person did not like.
  • ''We think our fathers fools, so wise we grow;
    Our wiser sons, no doubt will think us so.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Essay on Criticism.
  • ''Be thou the first true merit to befriend;
    His praise is lost who stays till all commend.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. II). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Is pride, the never-failing vice of fools.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. II). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Some have at first for wits, then poets passed,
    Turned critics next, and proved plain fools at last.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. I). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Learn hence for ancient rules a just esteem;
    To copy Nature is to copy them.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. I). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Words are like leaves; and where they most abound,
    Much fruit of sense beneath is rarely found.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. II). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
  • ''True ease in writing comes from art, not chance,
    As those move easiest who have learn'd to dance.
    'Tis not enough no harshness gives offence,
    The sound must seem an echo to the sense:''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. II). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Learn then what morals critics ought to show,
    For 'tis but half a judge's task, to know.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. III). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Good nature and good sense must ever join;
    To err is human, to forgive divine.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. II). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.

Read more quotations »

Sound and Sense

True ease in writing comes from art, not chance,
As those move easiest who have learned to dance.
'Tis not enough no harshness gives offense,
The sound must seem an echo to the sense:
Soft is the strain when Zephyr gently blows,
And the smooth stream in smoother numbers flows;
But when loud surges lash the sounding shore,
The hoarse, rough verse should like the torrent roar;
When Ajax strives some rock's vast weight to throw,

[Hata Bildir]