Alexander Pope

(21 May 1688 – 30 May 1744 / London / England)

Alexander Pope Quotes

  • ''So vast is art, so narrow human wit.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. I). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
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  • ''For fools rush in where angels fear to tread.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Essay on Criticism (Fr. III). . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Fools rush in where angels fear to tread.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. An Essay on Criticism, l. 625 (1711).
  • ''The worst of madmen is a saint run mad.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Imitations of Horace, bk. 1, epistle 6, "To Mr. Murray," l. 27 (1738).
  • ''An honest man's the noblest work of God.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. An Essay on Man (Fr. Epistle IV). SeCePo. Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Who breaks a butterfly on a wheel?''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. Lord Hervey, in Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot, l. 308 (1735). The line has passed into common usage, and achieved notoriety in the 1960s when it was used to head the London Times leader July 1, 1967, on Mick Jagger and Keith Richard's arrest on drugs charges—an article which was thought to have contributed to their acquittal.
  • ''What's fame? A fancied life in others' breath,''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. An Essay on Man (Fr. Epistle IV). SeCePo. Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
  • ''And die of nothing but a rage to live.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Moral Essays: Epistle to a Lady. . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.
  • ''Men would be angels, angels would be gods.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British satirical poet. An Essay On Man, epistle 1, l. 126 (1733).
  • ''Woman's at best a contradiction still.''
    Alexander Pope (1688-1744), British poet. Moral Essays: Epistle to a Lady. . . Poetical Works [Alexander Pope]. Herbert Davis, ed. (1978; repr. 1990) Oxford University Press.

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Best Poem of Alexander Pope

Ode On Solitude

Happy the man, whose wish and care
A few paternal acres bound,
Content to breathe his native air,
In his own ground.

Whose heards with milk, whose fields with bread,
Whose flocks supply him with attire,
Whose trees in summer yield him shade,
In winter fire.

Blest! who can unconcern'dly find
Hours, days, and years slide soft away,
In health of body, peace of mind,
Quiet by day,

Sound sleep by night; study and ease
Together mix'd; sweet ...

Read the full of Ode On Solitude

Essay On Man

The First Epistle

Awake, my ST. JOHN!(1) leave all meaner things
To low ambition, and the pride of Kings.
Let us (since Life can little more supply
Than just to look about us and to die)
Expatiate(2) free o'er all this scene of Man;
A mighty maze! but not without a plan;
A Wild, where weeds and flow'rs promiscuous shoot,

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